The fear of the Lord (YHWH) = The fear of the Lord (Jesus)

Fred

Well-known member
You don't seem to understand that prayer is one thing (προσεύχομαι) and calling upon (ἐπικαλέω) another.

Your eternal attempt to confound and conflate the Greek language is getting ridiculous.

To call upon the name of the Lord means to pray to the Lord.

Theological Lexicon of the New Testament: First Corinthians is addressed to "those who call upon the name of our Lord Jesus Christ in any place" (1 Cor 1:2), the church being the gathering of those who adore Christ, who celebrate his worship (cf. Ps 145:18) and pray to him from a pure heart. Over and against the religious individualism of the Greek cities, all believers are united in their adoration of Christ as Lord and God; their common "invocation" is the expression of their unity. (2:44, epikaleō)

Greek English Lexicon of the New Testament: to invoke, to pray to, to worship...of Christ...1 Cor. 1:2; Acts 22:16; also Acts 9:21. (epikaleō, pages 279-280)

Mounce's Complete Expository Dictionary of Old and New Testament Words: Jesus is the addressee when epikaleō is used in the sense of praying (Acts 7:59). (Call, page 93)

Harper's Bible Dictionary: Prayers are offered directly to Christ (Acts 7:59; 1 Cor. 1:2) (Prayer, page 817, Arland J. Hultgren)

A Greek and English Lexicon to the New Testament: To call upon, invoke, in prayer. Rom. 10:12, 14. 2 Tim. 2:22. Acts 7:59...JEHOVAH then was the name which eminently distinguished the true God from all false gods; and in the N.T. ἐπικαλέσηται τὸ ὄνομα κυρίου imports invoking the true God, with a confession that he is Jehovah, i.e. with an acknowledgement of his essential and incommunicable attributes. And in this view the phrase is applied to Christ, Acts 2:21. (Comp. Joel 2:32. Acts 9:13, 14, 21.) Acts 22:16. Rom. 10:13, (comp ver. 9, 11) 1 Cor. 1:2. (epikaleō, page 243)
 
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Fred

Well-known member
You don't seem to understand that prayer is one thing (προσεύχομαι) and calling upon (ἐπικαλέω) another.

Acts 1:24-25
(24) And they prayed (προσευξάμενοι) and said, You, Lord, who know the hearts of all, show which one of these two you have chosen
(25) to take the place in this ministry and apostleship from which Judas turned aside to go to his own place.” (ESV)

When the appellation "Lord" appears without reading "Lord Jesus" in Acts 1:24 it is important to keep in mind that whenever the following keys words from this prayer are found elsewhere in Scripture the "Lord" always refers to the Lord Jesus.
The passages in boldface are from the same author (Luke).
1. The "Lord" occurs along with the same Greek word for "shew" in Acts 1:24 - in reference to the Lord Jesus (Luke 10:1).
2. The "Lord" occurs along with the same Greek word for "chosen" in Acts 1:24 - in reference to the Lord Jesus (Acts 1:2; cf. v. 6; Luke 6:13; cf. vv. 5, 46; John 6:70; cf. v. 68 and John 13:18; cf. vv. 13-14).
3. The "Lord" occurs along with the same Greek word for "ministry" in Acts 1:25 - in reference to the Lord Jesus (Acts 1:17; cf. v. 21; 20:24; 1 Corinthians 12:5; Ephesians 4:12; cf. Ephesians 4:5; Colossians 4:17; 1 Timothy 1:12).
4. The "Lord" occurs along the same Greek word for "apostleship" in Acts 1:25 - in reference to the Lord Jesus (Romans 1:5; cf. Romans 1:4; 1 Corinthians 9:2).
 

101G

Well-known member
the fear of the "LORD", who is the "Lord", (in flesh), is the same one person. for the fear of the Lord is the beginning of Wisdom, Knowledge, and Understanding,

Prov 9:10 The fear of the LORD is the beginning of wisdom: and the knowledge of the holy is understanding.
 
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