The Fire of Purgatory

Southsider071

Well-known member
This is what noted RC theologian Johann Tetzel taught.

7 years of torment in the fires of purgatory for each and every sin committed.

That's what made the indulgences that he peddled such an in-demand commodity.

Quoting Tetzel here-


"Consider, that for each and every mortal sin it is necessary to undergo seven years of penitence after confession and contrition, either in this life or in Purgatory."
 

balshan

Well-known member
Is there truly "fire" in the place the RCC calls 'Purgatory'?
The RCC teaching on purgatory seems to have changed over the last couple of decades. We were taught it was just like hell, now it is just a warm shower. The punishment is not being with God. Interesting as we were taught babies that went to hell were perfectly happy in limbo but they just couldn't see God.

Modern RCs will scream out it is not a place. Which is the real purgatory?
 

balshan

Well-known member
This is what noted RC theologian Johann Tetzel taught.

7 years of torment in the fires of purgatory for each and every sin committed.

That's what made the indulgences that he peddled such an in-demand commodity.

Quoting Tetzel here-


"Consider, that for each and every mortal sin it is necessary to undergo seven years of penitence after confession and contrition, either in this life or in Purgatory."
Interesting he gives a time for each and every sin. I mean RCs tell us there is no time in purgatory.
 

RayneBeau

Well-known member
This is what noted RC theologian Johann Tetzel taught.

7 years of torment in the fires of purgatory for each and every sin committed.

That's what made the indulgences that he peddled such an in-demand commodity.

Quoting Tetzel here-


"Consider, that for each and every mortal sin it is necessary to undergo seven years of penitence after confession and contrition, either in this life or in Purgatory."
Good post! Thanks for sharing what RC theologian Johann Tetzel taught about the 7 years of torment in purgatory's fire for each and every sin committed - and of course this heresy was then, and probably still is openly taught to gullible Roman Catholic pew puppets who gobble this junk up and then make utter fools of themselves trying to defend this squirrels nest of unscriptural, mindless Roman Catholic babble.

Many Roman Catholic Church theologians assert that those who bestow mercy now upon the suffering souls in Purgatory, shall find great relief and assistance in Purgatory themselves; they consider active charity towards the holy souls a mark of predestination to eternal happiness. St. Thomas Aquinas said it was true that he who satisfies for the suffering souls does not satisfy for himself, but, it is also true, adds the saint, that he deserves more than the remission of pain, namely eternal life. And so it is that God Himself, by the mouth of the Royal Prophet, expresses Himself: "Blessed is he that understandeth concerning the needy and the poor; the Lord will deliver him in the evil day." (Ps. xl. 1.)

The assistance of the holy souls is also experienced in temporal wants, in favor of their benefactors. Bishop Colmar writes: "These destitute, suffering souls do not wait until they enter Heaven to exhibit their gratitude towards their benefactors: while they still languish in Purgatory, they pray without intermission for the welfare of the soul and body, obtain for them recovery from disease, assistance in poverty, help in necessities, counsel and protection on journeys and in danger, preservation and increase of their temporal goods, aid them in the salvation of souls, and above all, come to their relief in their agonies of death and before the judgment-seat of God."

Special Intercession:
Pray for the souls in Purgatory who are suffering for their want of gratitude - (RCC nuns and priests taught the grade/ high schoolers that those in [purgatory were suffering for their sins - not "gratitude." )

In Practice:
In spiritual and temporal wants, Roman Catholics are to take refuge to the holy souls in Purgatory.

* * * Eternal rest grant onto them, O Lord, and let perpetual light shine upon them; may they rest in peace. Amen. (To be said three times.)
 

Stella1000

Well-known member
Is there truly "fire" in the place the RCC calls 'Purgatory'?
Purgatory imagines the purging that brings purification on 'the Day' as per 1 Corinthians 3

12 Now if anyone builds on the foundation with gold, silver, precious stones, wood, hay, straw— 13 the work of each builder will become visible, for the Day will disclose it, because it will be revealed with fire, and the fire will test what sort of work each has done. 14 If what has been built on the foundation survives, the builder will receive a reward. 15 If the work is burned up, the builder will suffer loss; the builder will be saved, but only as through fire.

How do you understand that passage?
 

RiJoRi

Well-known member
Purgatory imagines the purging that brings purification on 'the Day' as per 1 Corinthians 3

12 Now if anyone builds on the foundation with gold, silver, precious stones, wood, hay, straw— 13 the work of each builder will become visible, for the Day will disclose it, because it will be revealed with fire, and the fire will test what sort of work each has done. 14 If what has been built on the foundation survives, the builder will receive a reward. 15 If the work is burned up, the builder will suffer loss; the builder will be saved, but only as through fire.

How do you understand that passage?
Greetings! To misquote a recent US president, it depends on what your meaning of "as" is! And it is there –Greek, DRC, and DRC versions (as well as others I have) all say "but only as through fire" or some variation thereof. ("but only", "yet", etc.). Please note that it does not say "but only through fire", but "as through fire", a simile.

--Rich
 

PeanutGallery

Well-known member
Purgatory imagines the purging that brings purification on 'the Day' as per 1 Corinthians 3

12 Now if anyone builds on the foundation with gold, silver, precious stones, wood, hay, straw— 13 the work of each builder will become visible, for the Day will disclose it, because it will be revealed with fire, and the fire will test what sort of work each has done. 14 If what has been built on the foundation survives, the builder will receive a reward. 15 If the work is burned up, the builder will suffer loss; the builder will be saved, but only as through fire.

How do you understand that passage?
Purgatory supposedly deals with venial sins; 1Cor 3 deals with works.
 

RayneBeau

Well-known member
Purgatory imagines the purging that brings purification on 'the Day' as per 1 Corinthians 3

12 Now if anyone builds on the foundation with gold, silver, precious stones, wood, hay, straw— 13 the work of each builder will become visible, for the Day will disclose it, because it will be revealed with fire, and the fire will test what sort of work each has done. 14 If what has been built on the foundation survives, the builder will receive a reward. 15 If the work is burned up, the builder will suffer loss; the builder will be saved, but only as through fire.

How do you understand that passage?
The Roman Catholic Church, in their attempt to find Biblical substantiation for the concept of Purgatory, like to point to those verses 1 Cor. 3: 12-15. That passage however has nothing to do at all with the Roman Catholic teaching of a place they dubbed as "Purgatory." To be relevant those verses would have to support the RCC doctrine of purgatory throughout the rest of the Word of God - which they do not.
 

Stella1000

Well-known member
The Roman Catholic Church, in their attempt to find Biblical substantiation for the concept of Purgatory, like to point to those verses 1 Cor. 3: 12-15. That passage however has nothing to do at all with the Roman Catholic teaching of a place they dubbed as "Purgatory." To be relevant those verses would have to support the RCC doctrine of purgatory throughout the rest of the Word of God - which they do not.
How do you interpret the passage? What does it mean that 'the builder will suffer loss, the builder will be saved, but only as through fire'. What distinguishes this way of being saved from the way of receiving the reward based on the quality of their foundations?
 

Stella1000

Well-known member
Greetings! To misquote a recent US president, it depends on what your meaning of "as" is! And it is there –Greek, DRC, and DRC versions (as well as others I have) all say "but only as through fire" or some variation thereof. ("but only", "yet", etc.). Please note that it does not say "but only through fire", but "as through fire", a simile.

--Rich
I agree. We aren't talking about a literal fire but something that acts in the way of fire in purification.
 

RiJoRi

Well-known member
I agree. We aren't talking about a literal fire but something that acts in the way of fire in purification.
Not too sure of the "purification" part - a house burned down wouldn't exactly be "purified"! 😉

And St. Paul is speaking of our works - what we have done here - being tested:
"the fire itself will prove the work of each, what sort it is". (It kind of reminds me of the story of the 3 pigs - they all had their works - the houses they built - tested by the wolf, but only one house stood the test.)

--Rich
 

RayneBeau

Well-known member
How do you interpret the passage? What does it mean that 'the builder will suffer loss, the builder will be saved, but only as through fire'. What distinguishes this way of being saved from the way of receiving the reward based on the quality of their foundations?
I actually think that Jesus is speaking of the "unpardonable sin" of blasphemy against the Holy Spirit in 1 Cor. 3:10-15. Although I think that those who interpret Scripture for the RCC look at that passage and say: 'Read this... see it is possible to have sins forgiven in the age to come, just as Jesus said.' They claim that this gives some sort of support to the RCC's doctrine of Purgatory. How do you interpret the passage? Do you believe that the Roman Catholic Church has a solid position here?
 

leonard03782

Well-known member
I actually think that Jesus is speaking of the "unpardonable sin" of blasphemy against the Holy Spirit in 1 Cor. 3:10-15. Although I think that those who interpret Scripture for the RCC look at that passage and say: 'Read this... see it is possible to have sins forgiven in the age to come, just as Jesus said.' They claim that this gives some sort of support to the RCC's doctrine of Purgatory. How do you interpret the passage? Do you believe that the Roman Catholic Church has a solid position here?
1 COR 3:

10
According to the grace of God which is given unto me, as a wise masterbuilder, I have laid the foundation, and another buildeth thereon. But let every man take heed how he buildeth thereupon.
11 For other foundation can no man lay than that is laid, which is Jesus Christ.
12 Now if any man build upon this foundation gold, silver, precious stones, wood, hay, stubble;
13 Every man's work shall be made manifest: for the day shall declare it, because it shall be revealed by fire; and the fire shall try every man's work of what sort it is.
14 If any man's work abide which he hath built thereupon, he shall receive a reward.
15 If any man's work shall be burned, he shall suffer loss: but he himself shall be saved; yet so as by fire.

I believe that this passage is talking about the Gospel of Jesus Christ and how we build on the foundation that is Jesus Christ.
Considering that rome builds a foundation on itself as well as Mary rather than on Jesus, It is my considered opinion that rc'ism is made of nothing more than flammable material that will be completely consumed. So, my answer to this question is that rome's faith is built on sand with a corrupt foundation.
 

Stella1000

Well-known member
Not too sure of the "purification" part - a house burned down wouldn't exactly be "purified"! 😉

And St. Paul is speaking of our works - what we have done here - being tested:
"the fire itself will prove the work of each, what sort it is". (It kind of reminds me of the story of the 3 pigs - they all had their works - the houses they built - tested by the wolf, but only one house stood the test.)

--Rich
We agree that there is a testing of our lived faith and how that stacks up through something that acts like a testing fire. Some are saved there and some are saved by the purging of the fire.

The doctrine of purgatory evolved as an antidote to the heresy of antinomianism ie. that salvation is not manifest in obedience to any moral norms. It makes 1 Corinthians 3 mean something.
 
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