The glories of atheism in action today.

Algor

Active member
Fair play! I think it has a lot to do with the writers style - and the reader's personal taste. While I never really got on with Tolkien I love a lot of the fantasy that is fairly obviously derived from his work.

The greatest enigma for me is Stephen King! Technically he writes very well, his dialogue is great, characters well developed, and plot lines interesting and novel. Yet, I really don't get on with his books...slogged through a few and can't really say I enjoyed them. His book "On Writing" is a fascinating look into the writers craft, a really wonderful book. I just can't get on with his fiction, for some reason I have yet to really identify!
Yeah. I think it also has to do with the age at which one gets exposed. There's a window during which the right person will bond to the right book very strongly.

King never did it for me. His novels bore me to distraction, though I have read one or two short stories of his that I thought were effective.
 

Furion

Well-known member
You will note that I didn't say Christianity is harmless, I said it was mostly harmless. I also noted that Christianity, like almost any religion can motivate people to do evil things.

What evil things? I see no direction from God to do evil. I think your statement is evil.

I guess christianity is superfluous to your statements.

Everything becomes "mostly harmless"

Almost every religion has some fringe of fanatics who are dangerous. That is what needs to be guarded against.
People are people, God is God, do try to keep them separated.
 

Whateverman

Well-known member
King never did it for me. His novels bore me to distraction, though I have read one or two short stories of his that I thought were effective.
I used to be a voracious reader. That stopped in my thirties, for reasons I don't entirely understand. However, at the age of 10 (IIRC) I was reading Tolkien and other fantasy/sci-fi.

I went through a horror phase in my early teens, and fell in love with King. Back then, he'd only published a (relatively) few books: Firestarter, Salem's Lot, The Stand - and they instantly became favorites.

That's when Cujo came out. I distinctly remember there being a magazine issue (Good Housekeeping? Women's Day? Something my mother would have been aware of) that boasted of having an exclusive excerpt of the book. I somehow got my hands on a copy, and read about a little kid with a monster in his/her closet. I remember enjoying it quite a bit, and looking forward to the book's release date.

When I finally got a copy, I was VERY disappointed. The book was about a rabid dog, not monsters in kids' closets. I remember being annoyed - and ever since then I sorta stopped reading King's books. I've read a few here and there, and have watched a number of his movies (some of which were great), but my enthusiasm had been destroyed by that one media stunt.

Not having read one in two decades, it might be a good time for me to try again. As I said, though, I don't often have the desire to read any more. It really bugs me, because I used to enjoy it a lot...
 

Algor

Active member
I used to be a voracious reader. That stopped in my thirties, for reasons I don't entirely understand. However, at the age of 10 (IIRC) I was reading Tolkien and other fantasy/sci-fi.

I went through a horror phase in my early teens, and fell in love with King. Back then, he'd only published a (relatively) few books: Firestarter, Salem's Lot, The Stand - and they instantly became favorites.

That's when Cujo came out. I distinctly remember there being a magazine issue (Good Housekeeping? Women's Day? Something my mother would have been aware of) that boasted of having an exclusive excerpt of the book. I somehow got my hands on a copy, and read about a little kid with a monster in his/her closet. I remember enjoying it quite a bit, and looking forward to the book's release date.

When I finally got a copy, I was VERY disappointed. The book was about a rabid dog, not monsters in kids' closets. I remember being annoyed - and ever since then I sorta stopped reading King's books. I've read a few here and there, and have watched a number of his movies (some of which were great), but my enthusiasm had been destroyed by that one media stunt.

Not having read one in two decades, it might be a good time for me to try again. As I said, though, I don't often have the desire to read any more. It really bugs me, because I used to enjoy it a lot...

I think like Tolkien, early exposure to King helps. My mum is a bt of a literature snob (in a passionate, polite way) and although she would never say anything, in retrospect I doubt she would have approved of King being in the house (Lovecraft flew under her radar tho....lucky me!). I still read a lot, but I think that's mostly that's because I've had to keep up the habit to survive in my job, but I read a lot more history, philosophy and technical works. It is the rare bit of fiction that I can read anymore without pulling it apart as I go. I find verse easier to enjoy than I used to.

Added in edit: The last fiction book I read that I can really say moved me was LeGuin's Left Hand of Darkness, something that I had started a couple of times before and kept getting interrupted. Picked it up again when I heard she died (I ate the Earthsea books a long time ago) and was surprised by it.
 
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