"We're being hacked" - Trump's homeland security advisor

Ficciones

Active member
"The magnitude of this ongoing attack is hard to overstate.

"The Russians have had access to a considerable number of important and sensitive networks for six to nine months. The Russian S.V.R. will surely have used its access to further exploit and gain administrative control over the networks it considered priority targets. For those targets, the hackers will have long ago moved past their entry point, covered their tracks and gained what experts call “persistent access,” meaning the ability to infiltrate and control networks in a way that is hard to detect or remove.

"While the Russians did not have the time to gain complete control over every network they hacked, they most certainly did gain it over hundreds of them. It will take years to know for certain which networks the Russians control and which ones they just occupy.

"The logical conclusion is that we must act as if the Russian government has control of all the networks it has penetrated. But it is unclear what the Russians intend to do next. The access the Russians now enjoy could be used for far more than simply spying."


 

vibise

Active member
"The magnitude of this ongoing attack is hard to overstate.

"The Russians have had access to a considerable number of important and sensitive networks for six to nine months. The Russian S.V.R. will surely have used its access to further exploit and gain administrative control over the networks it considered priority targets. For those targets, the hackers will have long ago moved past their entry point, covered their tracks and gained what experts call “persistent access,” meaning the ability to infiltrate and control networks in a way that is hard to detect or remove.

"While the Russians did not have the time to gain complete control over every network they hacked, they most certainly did gain it over hundreds of them. It will take years to know for certain which networks the Russians control and which ones they just occupy.

"The logical conclusion is that we must act as if the Russian government has control of all the networks it has penetrated. But it is unclear what the Russians intend to do next. The access the Russians now enjoy could be used for far more than simply spying."


Don't hold your breath waiting for the Republican led Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee to hold hearings on this. They are too busy holding hearings designed to amplify baseless conspiracy theories that claim Trump won the election rather than Biden.
 

Whateverman

Well-known member
Well hey, it turns out I am tired of all the "winning"...

This is a partially-solvable problem, and especially-so when money isn't much of an object. They know the telltale signs of what's been hacked, so they can wipe the hard drives and selectively restore things as necessary, cleaning as they go.

Yes, I'm massively over-simplifying the task, but if there's anyone uniquely in a position to solve a problem like this, it's the US government.

ps. what we can't solve is the intelligence that's been leaked/compromised, of course.
 

vibise

Active member
Well hey, it turns out I am tired of all the "winning"...

This is a partially-solvable problem, and especially-so when money isn't much of an object. They know the telltale signs of what's been hacked, so they can wipe the hard drives and selectively restore things as necessary, cleaning as they go.

Yes, I'm massively over-simplifying the task, but if there's anyone uniquely in a position to solve a problem like this, it's the US government.

ps. what we can't solve is the intelligence that's been leaked/compromised, of course.
Sure, cleaning up the mess is critically important, but it is also important to put safeguards in place to prevent this from happening and to catch it immediately when it happens. Also important is to identify the culprits and bring them to justice.
 

Ficciones

Active member

Barr Says Russia Likely to Blame in Hacking, Breaking With Trump


Attorney General William Barr said a massive cyber-attack on the U.S. government was likely carried out by Russia after President Donald Trump suggested China may have been responsible.

Barr on Monday joined other administration officials, including Secretary of State Michael Pompeo, in pointing to Russia.

“From the information I have, I agree with Secretary Pompeo’s assessment,” Barr, whose last day in office is Wednesday, said at the Justice Department. “It certainly appears to be the Russians but I’m not going to discuss it beyond that.”

A wide range of government agencies and large corporations have been impacted by the hack, which installed what is known as a backdoor in widely used software from Texas-based SolarWinds Corp. that allowed hackers access to computer networks.

Trump tweeted on Dec. 19: “I have been fully briefed and everything is well under control. Russia, Russia, Russia is the priority chant when anything happens because Lamestream is, for mostly financial reasons, petrified of discussing the possibility that it may be China (it may!)”

Trump’s tweet, his first public comments on the hack initially reported on Dec. 13, said the incident was “far greater in the Fake News Media than in actuality.”

Trump went on to suggest without evidence that there may also have been a “hit” on the nation’s voting machines, in his latest bid to cast doubt on his loss in November’s presidential election.

U.S. government agencies known to have been targeted in the hack included the State, Treasury, Homeland Security, Energy and Commerce departments. Microsoft Corp. said it had identified more than 40 customers targeted by the hackers.

Bloomberg News reported Saturday that at least 200 organizations, including government agencies and companies around the world, have been hacked as part of the suspected Russian cyber-attack.

Representative Mike Quigley, an Illinois Democrat who is a senior member on the House Intelligence Committee, said he’s reviewed material on the hack and took issue with Trump’s comments.

Quigley said Trump’s claim that “everything is under control is not true, and he knows that.” Quigley said it could take years for the U.S. to fully “extract” the extent of the breach.

On Sunday, Senator Mitt Romney said Russia “acted with impunity” in enacting the massive cyber breach and that Trump has a “blind spot” about it.

Speaking on NBC’s “Meet the Press,” the Utah Republican said the action attributed to Russia “demands a response, and the response you’d expect to occur would be a cyber response.” It’s unclear, though, if the U.S. has the capacity to do that in a way that would be of the same scale, he said.

Members of Congress have not received any all-members briefings from the intelligence community, though some staff members have.
 

Whateverman

Well-known member
It's funny how Democrats used to get insulted by implying they were soft on Russia, but now Republicans are almost literally rolling out the red carpet for our cold war adversary.

Unrelated to this, though interesting, is that Mitt Romney is now being called "vindicated", after he was mocked by many (including me) for labeling Russia as this country's greatest geopolitical adversary during the 2012 election. I live in MA, and even though I disliked the Republicans back then, I liked Romney. He kept his religion in-check, and solved a bunch of fiscal problems, and generally got the job done without a lot of nonsense. I hated when he pandered to Christian conservatives in his run for POTUS - but he keeps showing up and reminding me why I used to like him.

---

ps. I have no sympathy for Barr. None. Doesn't matter if he says stuff I agree with or not.
 
Top