What are the 4 Sola's of Lutheranism?

Bonnie

Super Member
I usually recall three.
Sola Gratia
Sola Fide
Sola Scriptura

You forgot sola Christus, or whatever it is in Greek. :)

Some have 5 solas:

The Five Solas are:

  • Sola Scriptura (“Scripture alone”): The Bible alone is our highest authority.
  • Sola Fide (“faith alone”): We are saved through faith alone in Jesus Christ.
  • Sola Gratia (“grace alone”): We are saved by the grace of God alone.
  • Solus Christus (“Christ alone”): Jesus Christ alone is our Lord, Savior, and King.
  • Soli Deo Gloria (“to the glory of God alone”):...
 

Bonnie

Super Member
You mean, this?

OIP.LWykqVh9WMgwjvgAV6q9vAHaKB



If so, been there, done that, too! :p
 

Josiah

Member
Lutherans speak of 3 - 5 "solas."


4 speak of justification (and are a "set" - inseparable):

Sola Gratia (Grace Alone, the basis of Justification rather than the goodiness of self)
Solus Christus (Christ Alone, He alone is the Savior and does the saving - not self)
Sola Fide (Faith Alone, the divine gift of faith apprehends/receives justification)
Soli Deo Gloria (To God be the Glory) It's all God's work, God's blessing, God's gift - and He alone gets the credit.

Another speaks of epistemology and specifies the norma normans - rule - canon for the evaluation of the correctness of positions:


Sola Scriptura (Scripture Alone) The Written Words of Scripture are the rule/canon/norma normans for the arbitration of doctrines.




.
 

Maxtar

Active member
You forgot sola Christus, or whatever it is in Greek. :)

Some have 5 solas:

Bonnie, is this true regarding and do you avail yourself of it? "Burdened and weighed down by sin, we are able to go to our pastor and confess our sins, knowing that by virtue of his office, he has been called to speak the word of Christ to us and in the stead of Christ to forgive our sins".
 

Bonnie

Super Member
Bonnie, is this true regarding and do you avail yourself of it? "Burdened and weighed down by sin, we are able to go to our pastor and confess our sins, knowing that by virtue of his office, he has been called to speak the word of Christ to us and in the stead of Christ to forgive our sins".
Is what true? Please be more specific.

All Lutherans can go to our pastors for private confession and absolution, and receive the forgiveness of sins, "by the command and in the stead of Jesus Christ", and in the "Name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit." My husband in his office of Pastor had a couple of parishioners avail themselves of that holy privilege.

Hubby was also chaplain for over 5 years to a man on death row for murder in the 2nd. degree. His Lutheran parents, in another state, asked my husband if he could visit their son every month, as they were only allowed to twice a year. My husband did so, and developed a warm friendship with the poor man. He gradually led the man back to Jesus Christ.

Then came the evening for the man's execution--he asked my husband to be with him at the end. He hesitated to do so, not sure if he could stand witnessing such a thing. I knew the murdered man's family would be there watching behind the glass, no doubt glad to see him go. I gently told my husband, "It might be comforting for him to know that there was someone behind the glass who was there for him, and didn't hate him." My husband thought it over, and decided I was correct. He was there. Right before the execution, my husband was able to give him the Lord's supper, hear him confess his sins, then forgive them in the Name of the Triune God, assured that he would be in heaven with Jesus, just as the thief on the cross was. The man died, confessing his faith.

This was the absolutely the hardest thing my husband ever did in his life--and also the best. Even better than marrying me. :)

He spent a week with the man's parents in the other state, and conducted the funeral, since their pastor had never met the executed man.

So yes, indeed, we Lutherans can avail ourselves of the comfort of private confession and absolution of our sins with our dear pastors. Did you not know that? :)
 

Nic

Well-known member
Bonnie, is this true regarding and do you avail yourself of it? "Burdened and weighed down by sin, we are able to go to our pastor and confess our sins, knowing that by virtue of his office, he has been called to speak the word of Christ to us and in the stead of Christ to forgive our sins".
Hi Maxtar,
Not Bonnie🥸
Private absolution grew out of the counseling to sinners having difficulty in acknowledging God's forgiveness with some or more sins the penitent found troubling despite the gospels declaration of forgiveness. This private meeting was the church providing comfort with the gospel in the strict sense (While we were yet sinners Christ died for us!)to those who were penitent and troubled. Additionally to those inpenitent the full burden of the law was given / applied. Applying comfort and or distress (looming death & destruction) is up to discretion and discernment of the pastor. At times, the pastor may get it wrong. Pastors are sinners too. As always restoration and forgiveness is the end goal.

Thanks.

Nic🙂
 

Maxtar

Active member
Hubby was also chaplain for over 5 years to a man on death row for murder in the 2nd. degree. His Lutheran parents, in another state, asked my husband if he could visit their son every month, as they were only allowed to twice a year. My husband did so, and developed a warm friendship with the poor man. He gradually led the man back to Jesus Christ.
That is so nice. A true Christian endeavor on your husbands part.
So yes, indeed, we Lutherans can avail ourselves of the comfort of private confession and absolution of our sins with our dear pastors. Did you not know that
No I did not. My wife never talked much about her Lutheran faith. After we first met we would go one week to the Lutheran service and the next week to the Catholic Mass. This went on for a couple of years and then out of the blue she decided to convert. You know, even though I am pretty conservative when it comes to these matters, it wasn't a big deal for me to attend a service with a woman minister. She was able to preach about Jesus as well as any man.
 

Bonnie

Super Member
That is so nice. A true Christian endeavor on your husbands part.

No I did not. My wife never talked much about her Lutheran faith. After we first met we would go one week to the Lutheran service and the next week to the Catholic Mass. This went on for a couple of years and then out of the blue she decided to convert. You know, even though I am pretty conservative when it comes to these matters, it wasn't a big deal for me to attend a service with a woman minister. She was able to preach about Jesus as well as any man.
Okay, but women ministers are unscriptural, and often leads to the slippery slope of liberalism. Our church picked up a few members from a local ELCA church, after 2009, when it approved the ordination of practicing gays of both semesters. They could no longer turn a blind eye to its errors, and joined our church.
 
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