What are you reading?

BornAgainRN

Active member
What are you reading? :)

I'm hoping people will respond to this thread more than once over time as they read different books. The Books subforum here moves very slowly, so ideally this thread will serve as one place for "water cooler discussion" between members of the forum community.

I'll reply below to kick off the thread.
I just finished reading through the MacArthur Daily Bible where you commit to reading a portion of it each day: 2 chapters from the Old Testament, part of the Psalms & Proverbs, and 1 chapter of the New Testament. Now, I am reading about end times, and Christian books arguing against evolution.
 

Torin

Well-known member
I just finished reading through the MacArthur Daily Bible where you commit to reading a portion of it each day: 2 chapters from the Old Testament, part of the Psalms & Proverbs, and 1 chapter of the New Testament. Now, I am reading about end times, and Christian books arguing against evolution.
That is kind of cool. I had a study Bible like that in middle school (I attended a Christian school). I'm not longer religious, but I've thought about going through a reading plan like you describe.
 

Mike McK

Well-known member
What are you reading? :)

I'm hoping people will respond to this thread more than once over time as they read different books. The Books subforum here moves very slowly, so ideally this thread will serve as one place for "water cooler discussion" between members of the forum community.

I'll reply below to kick off the thread.
I have a couple of books going.

1. Thoughts For Young Men - J.C. Ryle

I'm working with a group of at risk boys and we're going through this book. It should be given to all young men.


2. "Modern Fascism" - Gene Edward Veith


3. "Red Right Return" - John H. Cunningham

I met John and fellow author Chip Bell about six years ago and always keep their books on my shelf for "beach reads".
 

BornAgainRN

Active member
That is kind of cool. I had a study Bible like that in middle school (I attended a Christian school). I'm not longer religious, but I've thought about going through a reading plan like you describe.
If you want to read a really good book on the end-times, I highly recommend "The Second Coming" by John MacArthur (same author as the Daily Bible I mentioned before). His reading plan is really good too. It's amazing how much you forget, even if you have read the Bible before. Going through a reading plan like this keeps you committed & you learn (or relearn) so much in a relatively short period of time. The year just flies by!
 

Torin

Well-known member
Update:

I have completed Our Oriental Heritage by Will Durant. The book gave me more of a sense of the variety of cultures that have existed in Asia, as well as the varieties that have existed within each of those cultures. It also gave me a sense of how sophisticated ancient civilizations were. I had the sense, before reading this book, that the ancient world was far more monolithic, primitive, and superstitious than it actually was. I also had no appreciation of all the science, technology, and culture that the West has taken over from these Asian civilizations, which is what Durant calls "our Oriental heritage." I would strongly recommend this book if you have the stamina for 900+ pages of history.

I've moved on to Fossil Future by Alex Epstein, which is a defense of using even more fossil fuels than we currently are. (Yes, you read that correctly.)

I am not sure whether I agree with Epstein's overall thesis or not, at present. That said, one point he makes that I think is correct is that the benefits of fossil fuels are usually overlooked in the current discussion. Nearly all of the discussion is about the supposed catastrophic downsides of fossil fuels - the catastrophic fires, storms, temperature increases, etc., that may result.

However, Epstein makes a very plausible case that there is no currently practical way of providing food, clothing, shelter, transportation, etc., etc., for the billions of people on earth without using a lot of fossil fuels. As he lays out in detail, our modern standard of living is provided by the operation of many machines. Those machines require energy, and the only way to get that energy right now is to burn fossil fuels.

If we do have to stop using fossil fuels (or start using a lot less of them), that is an immense tragedy. I don't see that discussed much today.
 

Caroljeen

Well-known member
I'm currently reading Can Science explain every thing? by John Lennox. It's written as an "introduction to the question of science and the Christian faith..." I'm halfway through and for the most part I understand his arguments. There is one section, Mythbusters I: Religion depends on faith, but science doesn't, with which I am struggling to follow his reasoning and will be going over it again and again until I understand it. I recommend this book to Christian and atheist alike.

Lennox writes on the inside jacket his hope that this book "...stimulates you to approach this question (of science and the Christian faith) in a scientific way: that is, open to what the outcome may be and prepared to follow the evidence where it leads."
 
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Mike McK

Well-known member
I'm currently reading Can Science explain every thing? by John Lennox. It's written as an "introduction to the question of science and the Christian faith..." I'm halfway through and for the most part I understand his arguments. There is one section, Mythbusters I: Religion depends on faith, but science doesn't, with which I am struggling to follow his reasoning and will be going over it again and again until I understand it. I recommend this book to Christian and atheist alike.

Lennox writes on the inside jacket his hope that this book "...stimulates you to approach this question (of science and the Christian faith) in a scientific way: that is, open to what the outcome may be and prepared to follow the evidence where it leads."
Is this a new book? I've seen several people in a Facebook group I'm in reference this book lately.
 

Caroljeen

Well-known member
Is this a new book? I've seen several people in a Facebook group I'm in reference this book lately.
The initial printing-2019. Not brand new ... I found out about it after watching a debate he had with Richard Dawkins. I thought he made good points and searched Amazon for books that he authored. This book is well worth the money if you are interested in the subject matter.

 

Torin

Well-known member
Update:

I have finished up a couple of books over the last few days.

(1) I finished up the last couple of chapters of Fossil Future by Alex Epstein. These were predominantly about why there's so much resistance to fossil fuel use and how to persuade people that fossil fuel use is good. Epstein made the insightful observation that people although do not usually change views that they embrace explicitly as a part of their identity, opposition to fossil fuels is based on philosophical premises that people do not usually embrace explicitly and do not usually hold as a part of their identity. This makes it more likely, but not certain, that Epstein's persuasive efforts will succeed.

(2) I finished a very short, but very enjoyable, book about 19th and 20th century art by Hans Jaffe. The book started out with an essay explaining that, for Jaffe, the central problem of 19th and 20th century art was the problem of reality. The rest of the book presented 200 or so pictures of paintings by various artists with about a paragraph of commentary for each painting. Basically, the development was from artists who were not sure what the essence of reality was, to artists who denied that reality exists or ought to be represented. The paintings reminded me of how much I dislike certain streams of contemporary art (I have never been able to "get" Pollock), but it also gave me some appreciation of the variety of types of modern art and some sense of why people enjoy certain strains of it.

I am now reading the Classics Club edition of Francis Bacon's Essays and New Atlantis.
 

Torin

Well-known member
Update:

I quickly abandoned the Francis Bacon book, sadly. I decided it was too much parsing of old timey English.

In the meantime, I've read a book on the nature of heroism by the Objectivist philosopher Andrew Bernstein, which I found really inspiring.

I am now reading a biography of George Washington entitled Washington: The Indispensable Man.
 
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