What are you reading?

Taking a break from Middle Earth. Now reading Samuel Butler's Erewhon.

I picked this up a long time ago and never finished it: I recall now why this is so. It isn't a very interesting novel, though it is good satire.
 
OK, Finished Erewhon. Started something on my to read list for a while: E.E. Cummings: A Biography by C. Sawyer-Laucanno. I have an absolutely dogeared hardback of his collected poems that I bought in undergrad.

What a self-centered jerk! LOL. I knew he was a bit off plumb. But the dude could write.
 
Rudyard Kipling's Kim. Cracking good read!

I have his complete verse, which is good fun, and I grew up on the Jungle Books, so this is like my third or fifth childhood.
 
I wanted to take a break from my usual historical books and try a bit of fantasy fiction for a change. So I read

”The Fifth Season” by Jemisin

because it had good reviews. It is part of a trilogy which I plan to continue. It is about humans with powers over earth, tectonic plates, volcanoes. They are controlled by another class of humans called “Guardians” with powers over the earth movers. There also are beings that live IN the earth controlled by no one. And then there are your ordinary run of the mill humans powerless and weak, ie., the sheep. Always the sheep. Ha ha! Characters are intriguing, story is good. I enjoyed it because it is different, novel and immersive in a mythical world refreshingly new (Versus dragons, wizards, demons, or vampires). Something different if that is what you are looking for. On a 1 to 5 scale I give it a 4.
 
I am now reading another "Civic Classics" book called Supreme Court Decisions, edited by Richard Beeman. The book is a series of short excerpts from famous Supreme Court decisions with some expert commentary. I'd recommend it if you are a layman with a casual interest in politics and Constitutional law, like I am.
 
I am now reading another "Civic Classics" book called Supreme Court Decisions, edited by Richard Beeman. The book is a series of short excerpts from famous Supreme Court decisions with some expert commentary. I'd recommend it if you are a layman with a casual interest in politics and Constitutional law, like I am.
Moving on from the "Civic Classics" book above, I've started on Antonin Scalia's book A Matter of Interpretation: Federal Courts and the Law, which defends legal originalism.
 
Moving on from the "Civic Classics" book above, I've started on Antonin Scalia's book A Matter of Interpretation: Federal Courts and the Law, which defends legal originalism.
I have finished the Scalia book. I have also finished a very short, very patriotic book by Bradley Thompson entitled What America Is.

I am now reading a much longer book entitled Founding America: Documents from the Revolution to the Bill of Rights, edited by Jack Rakove. It's a collection of primary sources about the founding of the United States. I am planning to take my time with this book so that I can absorb what the various primary sources are saying.
 
Wrap Up for 2023

Here are the books I finished this year.

1. Our Oriental Heritage
2. Fossil Future
3. 20,000 Years of World Painting
4. Heroes, Legends, Champions
5. Washington: The Indispensable Man
6. Abe
7. Illuminating Ayn Rand
8. Prague Winter
9. A Concise History of Germany
10. The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin
11. The Federalist Papers
12. How to Read the Constitution and Why
13. Supreme Court Decisions
14. A Matter of Interpretation
15. What America Is

I don't expect to get through the book I'm currently reading before the end of the year, so that's that for a while.
 
Yeah, the Left is very weird. I've seen them claim the reason for the revolutionary war was to keep their slaves, and the reason for the second amendment so that slaveholders can massacre the Black race, which is false on SO many levels!
Vibise believes this.
 
I'm currently reading Heaven by Randy Alcorn. "Other than the Bible itself, this may well be the single most life-changing book you'll ever read" -- Stu Weber.

For my fiction I'm reading Alien Echo by Mira Grant. "A spellbinding novel of courage and terror" -- Jonathan Maberry.
 
I am now reading the book A Concise History of France, by Roger Price. It's part of the "Cambridge Concise Histories" series. I read A Concise History of Germany last year, which was in the same series, and I thought it was well done.

I'm reading this book for several reasons.

First, France is simply a very interesting country. It has produced a lot of cool art and philosophy, and I've never read a full book about its history before. (Sometimes I just strike out on a new topic like this.)

Second, I think that if I read this book, I'll be better able to understand what is going on in the news when France is mentioned. I've heard of a couple of big names like Macron, but I don't really know anything about French politics beyond that, so hopefully this will give me some background.

Third, I have the possibly grandiose hope that I'll be able to draw some broader lessons about history and human nature from reading about countries other than America. I read a lot of books about America last year, as you can see from my 2023 reading list (a couple of posts above this one). I would like to think that broadening my history reading to other countries will be beneficial.

I was inspired to read this book partly by the Napoleon movie, which I just saw on Netflix. It was a good movie.
 
I abandoned the France book quickly, because I didn't think it was too well done. There's not enough emphasis on ideas, and the book itself was so concise and trying to do so much that it just reads like a list of kings.

Since then, I have settled on Andrew Roberts's biography of Winston Churchill, Churchill: Walking With Destiny. It is very good and is rapidly turning Churchill into a hero of mine.
 
I attended a Civil War re-enactment over the weekend and somebody at the SCV booth gave me three books;

"Blood Money: The Civil War And The Federal Reserve" by John Graham

Essentially, it's about financiers who provoked both sides to go to war, thinking it would just be a couple of small skirmishes, but then quickly realize they started a war.

One of the interesting things about the book is that Great Britain, France, and Germany all had interests in both sides of the war, and much of the book is told from their point of view.

It's a really interesting read, especially when you stop to think of the parallels to today's current events.

"The Reason Lincoln Had To Die" by Don Thomas

"When In the Course Of Human Events: Arguing The Case For Secession" by Charles Adams

I've been aware of this one for a long time, but have never gotten around to reading it until now.
 
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