When?

When did the Jews change the determination of the seventh day sabbath to Saturday of the Julian Gregorian calendar from being determined by the lunar cycle like the rest of the feasts God commanded in the book of Leviticus?
 

Open Heart

Well-known member
When did the Jews change the determination of the seventh day sabbath to Saturday of the Julian Gregorian calendar from being determined by the lunar cycle like the rest of the feasts God commanded in the book of Leviticus?
There was never a change. Sabbath has always been determined by the seventh day on the Jewish calendar. It just happens that the sabbath on the Jewish calendar is also Saturday, the seventh day, on the Gregorian calendar. Sabbath was NEVER determined by the lunar cycle -- a lunar cycle is roughly 30 days, and is not evenly divisible by 7.
 

BJ Bear

Well-known member
There was never a change. Sabbath has always been determined by the seventh day on the Jewish calendar. It just happens that the sabbath on the Jewish calendar is also Saturday, the seventh day, on the Gregorian calendar. Sabbath was NEVER determined by the lunar cycle -- a lunar cycle is roughly 30 days, and is not evenly divisible by 7.
The extra days at the end of the year weren't counted as were the other days. In that way the new year would always start on the right day at the right time.

The change in the way the calendar is reckoned only masks the inevitable slip between the two calendars for a longer period of time.
 

Open Heart

Well-known member
The counting of days began all over again with every new moon.
Ridiculous. If that were true, then you would end up having a "week" longer than seven days at the end of every month, which would essentially abrogate the idea of resting on the seventh day. You have managed to "impress" me with your lack of reasoning skills.
 

Open Heart

Well-known member
The extra days at the end of the year weren't counted as were the other days. In that way the new year would always start on the right day at the right time.

The change in the way the calendar is reckoned only masks the inevitable slip between the two calendars for a longer period of time.
There has been no change in the Jewish calendar. See my answer to Christian SDA above.
 
The counting of all of days in a biblical month begins at the new moon.

Example: The 10th day of the first month is the day that the Passover lamb was chosen and set aside.

Example: the 14th day of the first month is always the pass over.

Example: the 15th day of the first month is always the first day of the feast of unleavened bread.

Example: The 10th day of the 7th month was always the day of atonement.

Example: the 15th day of the seventh month was always the first day of the feast of tabernacles.
 

Open Heart

Well-known member
The counting of all of days in a biblical month begins at the new moon.

Example: The 10th day of the first month is the day that the Passover lamb was chosen and set aside.

Example: the 14th day of the first month is always the pass over.

Example: the 15th day of the first month is always the first day of the feast of unleavened bread.

Example: The 10th day of the 7th month was always the day of atonement.

Example: the 15th day of the seventh month was always the first day of the feast of tabernacles.
But the counting of the days of the week is not connected to the lunar cycle, as I said.
 

Open Heart

Well-known member
There is no mention or instruction regarding counting “days of the week“.

The only reference regarding day numbers is to the month which begins with
We have the existance of the Jewish calendar, which is what is used to determine the weeks.

1. You have NO EVIDENCE that the weeks were EVER determined differently. NONE.
2. Your position is irrational, because if you tag on "extra days" at the end of the month, you end up with a week that would be longer than seven days, thus utterly violating the teaching of resting on the seventh day.

IOW you don't have a leg to stand on.
 

BJ Bear

Well-known member
We have the existance of the Jewish calendar, which is what is used to determine the weeks.

1. You have NO EVIDENCE that the weeks were EVER determined differently. NONE.
2. Your position is irrational, because if you tag on "extra days" at the end of the month, you end up with a week that would be longer than seven days, thus utterly violating the teaching of resting on the seventh day.

IOW you don't have a leg to stand on.
You are reading an alien context and anachronistic method of reckoning days into Scripture. For example, just as a lunar calendar year isn't equally divisible by seven (a previous objection on your part) neither is a solar calendar year equally divisible by seven.

So New Year's Day of the common Western Gentile calendar falls on a different day of the week each year. The question to ask then is in what way were the Israelites told to reckon the first day of their year?
 

BJ Bear

Well-known member
When did the Jews change the determination of the seventh day sabbath to Saturday of the Julian Gregorian calendar from being determined by the lunar cycle like the rest of the feasts God commanded in the book of Leviticus?
Hi! I came across this thread through the lighting icon and didn't realize it was on the Judaism board. IIRC, the date was late, sometime after 1000AD.
 

Open Heart

Well-known member
You are reading an alien context and anachronistic method of reckoning days into Scripture.
No, actually I'm not. The sacred texts are very clear that keeping the sabbath means to rest from labor on the seventh day. It's crystal clear. YOUR interpretation abrogates this.
 

BJ Bear

Well-known member
No, actually I'm not. The sacred texts are very clear that keeping the sabbath means to rest from labor on the seventh day. It's crystal clear. YOUR interpretation abrogates this.
Surely you recognize that neither the solar or lunar calendar is evenly divisible by seven. That means that if a person reckoned seven days in a strictly mathematical männer without adjustments then the seventh day would cycle through the days of the week as the years progress.

Try doing a search. The adaptation to the solar calendar method of reckoning is common knowledge.
 

Open Heart

Well-known member
Surely you recognize that neither the solar or lunar calendar is evenly divisible by seven.
Which is why weeks function independently of both. I don't know why you don't get this. It's not exactly rocket science.

To be sure, I did try googling when and why the calendar was changed, looking for anything remotely suggesting that there were extra days added onto the last week of the month. Absolutely NOTHING came up. So no, this is not "common knowledge."
 
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