Where are the corpses?

Fenuay

Well-known member
I think it turns the frogs gay too, doesn’t it?
Hahahahahaha!! That was one of the biggest laughs I ever had when Alex Jones said that crap! I loved when Marco Rubio was like who are you? Don't touch me! Alex looked like such a simple bully in that video!
 

Whateverman

Well-known member
I think a lot of people who are worried about the vaccines fear what we may see in the next ten years or so post vaccine. I have seen reactions at the hospital I worked for but they all passed within a few days. We have had no deaths at the hospital that have been directly attributed to the vaccine. In time who knows what we will see. I personally believe nothing will come of it. My concern is just for those who cannot get the shot for medical reasons. But most of those will only be temporary and they will be able to receive the vaccine in time. If not they will likely be too sick to work or have much concern about being vaccinated if everyone around them is.
I'm having a difficult time treating primarily unreasonable people as reasonable.

Yes, there are obviously folks who are simply misinformed about the vaccines, and there are also valid questions about the safety of those vaccines. Nonetheless, most of the people who aren't getting vaccinated are doing so for unreasonable reasons: mistrust of science / experts / authority, a steady willful diet of misinformation, political tribalism, etc.

I have no problem with folks who CAN'T get vaccinated for medical / health reasons. I have sympathy with some who are genuinely nervous about the vaccinations, though this is slowly waning as the number of vaccine doses administered is almost 3.7 billion - and all without piles of dead people.

The rest are choosing to remain unvaccinated because they're stupid/selfish. Yes, that's my opinion. It can/will change if I start seeing reasonable objections to the COVID vaccines...
 
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Faithoverbelief

Well-known member
I'm having a difficult time treating primarily unreasonable people as reasonable.

Yes, there are obviously folks who are simply misinformed about the vaccines, and there are also valid questions about the safety of those vaccines. Nonetheless, most of the people who aren't getting vaccinated are doing so for unreasonable reasons: mistrust of science / experts / authority, a steady willful diet of misinformation, political tribalism, etc.

I have no problem with folks who CAN'T get vaccinated for medical / health reasons. I have sympathy with some who are genuinely nervous about the vaccinations, though this is slowly waning as the number of vaccine doses administered is almost 3.7 billion - and all without piles of dead people.

The rest are choosing to remain unvaccinated because they're stupid/selfish. Yes, that's my opinion. It can/will change if I start seeing reasonable objections to the COVID vaccines...
But but you'll turn into a magnetic anomaly that will turn into a black hole.....😙😗😁
 

Magdalena

Well-known member
There is a whistleblower report about to come out that shows over 43,000 deaths from covid vaccines so far. This is coming from hospital coded medical records.
 

Authentic Nouveau

Well-known member
Not on actual, legitimate medical and science-based websites and journals. No need.
Bluff and bluster.
You are a medical outsider

You think you know enough about a subject to think you are right. You don't know nearly enough to know you are wrong.

Medical care providers don't mess with web sites. They went to school. You didn't.

Why do you devote so much time disagreeing with professionals?
 

Whateverman

Well-known member
There is a whistleblower report about to come out that shows over 43,000 deaths from covid vaccines so far. This is coming from hospital coded medical records.
I'm willing to bet the sourcing is gonna be sketchy...

But let it come out, and we'll see.

Regardless, 43,000 deaths out of 3.69 billion administered doses is still an amazingly reasonable risk.
 

Fenuay

Well-known member
I'm having a difficult time treating primarily unreasonable people as reasonable.

Yes, there are obviously folks who are simply misinformed about the vaccines, and there are also valid questions about the safety of those vaccines. Nonetheless, most of the people who aren't getting vaccinated are doing so for unreasonable reasons: mistrust of science / experts / authority, a steady willful diet of misinformation, political tribalism, etc.

I have no problem with folks who CAN'T get vaccinated for medical / health reasons. I have sympathy with some who are genuinely nervous about the vaccinations, though this is slowly waning as the number of vaccine doses administered is almost 3.7 billion - and all without piles of dead people.

The rest are choosing to remain unvaccinated because they're stupid/selfish. Yes, that's my opinion. It can/will change if I start seeing reasonable objections to the COVID vaccines...
I don't disagree with you.
 

Fenuay

Well-known member
Thanks. You're generally a more forgiving person than I am about this subject - to your credit.
Lol! Thank you! I try to be forgiving and kind because I know how hard life is. I believe discussions with love and kindness will be more helpful than all the political division we have especially regarding this vaccine. It's sad really.
 

Authentic Nouveau

Well-known member
I'm surprised you did. I didn't. I'm just getting to the point that I'm tired of all the negativity surrounding public safety. Sure there are risks with everything but not everything is some government conspiracy to kill us.

I had the same experience with Ibuprofen for the same reason!!!! And my doctor told me to take 1000mg a day or twice a day as needed for my cramps. A few years went by and they FINALLY did a sonogram and I had three cysts twisted around my right ovary. Could have spared me the bleeding ulcers if they had just checked.

Dr had covid. His wife had it.

There is only 1 "Doc" on teevee about covid Fauchi.
He has never treated a covid patient.
 

Gondwanaland

Active member
I'm having a difficult time treating primarily unreasonable people as reasonable.

Yes, there are obviously folks who are simply misinformed about the vaccines, and there are also valid questions about the safety of those vaccines. Nonetheless, most of the people who aren't getting vaccinated are doing so for unreasonable reasons: mistrust of science / experts / authority, a steady willful diet of misinformation, political tribalism, etc.

I have no problem with folks who CAN'T get vaccinated for medical / health reasons. I have sympathy with some who are genuinely nervous about the vaccinations, though this is slowly waning as the number of vaccine doses administered is almost 3.7 billion - and all without piles of dead people.

The rest are choosing to remain unvaccinated because they're stupid/selfish. Yes, that's my opinion. It can/will change if I start seeing reasonable objections to the COVID vaccines...
I choose to not get vaccinated because I already had the virus and have natural immunity (which is just as robust if not more than the immunity developed by those same immunological systems that vaccines use to target the spike protein).

There is no evidence of any statistically significant increase in immunity for people with natural immunity getting vaccinated after, and in fact, there's at least one study indicating that getting a two-dose vaccine can actually inhibit/harm T-cell response in those who have already had an infection and recovered
 

Michael R2

Active member
I choose to not get vaccinated because I already had the virus and have natural immunity (which is just as robust if not more than the immunity developed by those same immunological systems that vaccines use to target the spike protein).

There is no evidence of any statistically significant increase in immunity for people with natural immunity getting vaccinated after, and in fact, there's at least one study indicating that getting a two-dose vaccine can actually inhibit/harm T-cell response in those who have already had an infection and recovered
There have been laboratory studies that have suggested what they are calling a 'hybrid immunity' (natural plus a subsequent vaccine) seems to be very robust. Again, these are laboratory studies and real world inquiries are only just beginning.

 

Gondwanaland

Active member
There have been laboratory studies that have suggested what they are calling a 'hybrid immunity' (natural plus a subsequent vaccine) seems to be very robust. Again, these are laboratory studies and real world inquiries are only just beginning.

A very massive study with the Cleveland Clinic indicates no statistically significant benefit:

Israel in its entirety indicates no significant benefit: https://www.theblaze.com/op-ed/horo...n-much-stronger-than-vaccine-induced-immunity

Indications that vaccine may inhibit t-cell response in previously infected: https://www.biorxiv.org/content/10.1101/2021.03.22.436441v1.full.pdf

And that's not even yet touching on increased risk of side effects (including moderate and severe ones) for previously infected who get the vaccine:

 

Thistle

Well-known member
It's only 8:26 long....enjoy!!!



Canadian doctor Charles Hoffe believes that the mRNA shots manufacture microscopic blood clots in the capillaries of the vaccinated and at least 60 percent could eventually succumb to heart failure. He says there are 40 TRILLION mRNA molecules in a single dose! Dr. Hoffe explains: “We now know that only 25 percent of the ‘vaccine’ injected into a person’s arm actually stays in your arm. The other 75 percent is collected by your lymphatic system and literally fed into your circulation so these little packages of messenger RNA, and by the way in a single dose of Moderna ‘vaccine’ there are literally 40 trillion mRNA molecules....continue to article.
If that mechanism that he describes is in anyway accurate that is horrifying!
 

Michael R2

Active member
A very massive study with the Cleveland Clinic indicates no statistically significant benefit:
This study was done in March 2020, prior to any significant spread of even the alpha or beta variants.
I've read this before. As far as I know, the data itself is not available, just the news reports. I'm not saying they are wrong, but it's hard to judge without the data.
Indications that vaccine may inhibit t-cell response in previously infected: https://www.biorxiv.org/content/10.1101/2021.03.22.436441v1.full.pdf
It does seem to show an increase in antibody response after a single dose and a decrease in a double dose. That is definitely worth pursuing further.
And that's not even yet touching on increased risk of side effects (including moderate and severe ones) for previously infected who get the vaccine:
This one is worth looking into further. It would have been nice if they had actually reported what the adverse effects had been.
This one shows greater chance of adverse effects from the viral based vaccines and only minor effects from the mRNA vaccines, similar to normal adverse effects.
 

vibise

Well-known member
All those videos..are made up..fakes...or all the videos had sweaty skin?

Have you tried it on yourself or your husband?

Do you understand the theories as to why it may work?

What I also saw was a guy placing a lightbulb next to the poison jab site and the light lighted. Pretty convincing for the gullible. What I did was go to a magic catalog and looked for that trick and found the exact same lightbulb.


The mRNA is inside nano-particles capsules. They seem to make it through your needles.


I don't believe it's possible...to much electronics involved.

Do you still have a link to the video?


You make it sound like the poison jab help women with their pregnancy...considering the miscarriages only happened to the placebi group. That one I'll red flag.


The mRNA sequence can become part of your DNA. Not will but can. I've had it explained how but forget the big words used. If I can find the article or video I'll post it for you.

Yup. Matt 24 says...See that you are not alarmed, for this must take place, but the end is not yet.
There is a process called retrotransposition in which mRNAs are converted into DNAs that can then insert into the cell's chromosomal DNA. This process is mediated by endogenous retroelements called LINE1, which encode the enzyme that does this. Our genomes thus contain what are called pseudogenes, which are DNA insertions of copies of mRNAs produced by cellular genes. These are mostly junk DNA.

This is a very rare event. The process works not just with cellular mRNAs but also with the RNAs produced by viral infections. So mammalian cells carry DNA copies of viral genome bits from past virus infections - when I say past infections, I mean from viruses that infected our ancestors, and were inherited by us.
 

Gondwanaland

Active member
This study was done in March 2020, prior to any significant spread of even the alpha or beta variants.
I'm unsure where in the world you are getting that.

If you merely scrolled down you'd see that Day 0 of the study was DECEMBER of 2020, EIGHT MONTHS after March 2020. The data were collected for 150 days IIRC, through May 2021.

So where you got this 'done in March 2020' is rather mindboggling (especially as it is a study about vaccination, which had not even begun in March 2020??????)
I've read this before. As far as I know, the data itself is not available, just the news reports. I'm not saying they are wrong, but it's hard to judge without the data.

It does seem to show an increase in antibody response after a single dose and a decrease in a double dose. That is definitely worth pursuing further.

This one is worth looking into further. It would have been nice if they had actually reported what the adverse effects had been.

This one shows greater chance of adverse effects from the viral based vaccines and only minor effects from the mRNA vaccines, similar to normal adverse effects.
It's heightened for both, above normal adverse effects.

Y'all can keep your vaccine. I don't need it, I have a functioning immune system that has memory cells (people who had SARS 17 years ago, their memory cells found covid to be similar enough that they produce effective antibodies against it. 17 years after an infection by a cousin of covid - there's zero evidence of immunity disappearing, and plenty of evidence it will be here for YEARS). Not worth the risks to get essentially no benefit (and possible detriment). My doctor concurs, especially after I showed him the T-cell study.
 
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