Who Decided on the Books in the New Testament Canon?

YeshuaFan

Well-known member
Regarding the nature of the New Testament canon: considering all the works produced in the first 200 years of Christianity, why were some universally included (the Gospels, Acts, and writings of Paul), other were included reluctantly (James, Jude, 2 Peter, 3 John, Hebrews, and Book of Revelation), and other rejected (the Didache, the Sheppard of Hermas, Gospel of the Hebrew, and Acts of Paul)? (Eusebius Chapter 25) How do you know and trust that your New Testament is not missing or have book that should not be included?
All NT books were penned down by end of first century, being already circulated as scriptures, all Gospels were received as such, and only so called disputed were 2 peter, not sure if was authored by peter, Hebrews, not sure of paul, James, questions on good works salvation, and Revelation, question which John, so all but them were recogzied early on!
 

Theophilos

Active member
All NT books were penned down by end of first century, being already circulated as scriptures, all Gospels were received as such, and only so called disputed were 2 peter, not sure if was authored by peter, Hebrews, not sure of paul, James, questions on good works salvation, and Revelation, question which John, so all but them were recogzied early on!
The first list of the books found in the modern New Testament dates from 367.

2 Peter, 2 John, 3 John, Jude, Revelation were not added to the canon in parts of the Syriac Bible until 250 years later. St. John Chrysostom wrote extensive commentaries on the New Testament, but limited the commentaries to the Syriac canon.

 

YeshuaFan

Well-known member
The first list of the books found in the modern New Testament dates from 367.

2 Peter, 2 John, 3 John, Jude, Revelation were not added to the canon in parts of the Syriac Bible until 250 years later. St. John Chrysostom wrote extensive commentaries on the New Testament, but limited the commentaries to the Syriac canon.

23 of the 27 NT books were recognized and in use as authoritative early on, and the remaining 4 were later on due to issues on their authorship!
 

ziapueblo

Active member
It can't be... The Septuagint is used by Catholics, therefore is a out of bounds.
The Septuagint was used by the early Christians. We Orthodox use the Septuagint in our Scriptures. Out of 300 Old Testament quotes or so, more than 2/3 come from the Septuagint. One example is Matthew 1:23. St Matthew quotes the Septuagint Isaiah 7:14, "behold a virgin shall conceive." The Masoretic text is "behold, a young woman shall conceive." Look in your Bible, I'm sure it will have a note on it. As a matter of fact, most Bibles nowadays use the Septuagint as a reference. There are a hundred examples or more of this. Any Protestant Scripture scholar knows this.
 

Anselm01

Active member
The Septuagint was used by the early Christians. We Orthodox use the Septuagint in our Scriptures. Out of 300 Old Testament quotes or so, more than 2/3 come from the Septuagint. One example is Matthew 1:23. St Matthew quotes the Septuagint Isaiah 7:14, "behold a virgin shall conceive." The Masoretic text is "behold, a young woman shall conceive." Look in your Bible, I'm sure it will have a note on it. As a matter of fact, most Bibles nowadays use the Septuagint as a reference. There are a hundred examples or more of this. Any Protestant Scripture scholar knows this.
I agree with you. I was being sarcastic. Sorry.
 

Theo1689

Well-known member
The Septuagint was used by the early Christians. We Orthodox use the Septuagint in our Scriptures. Out of 300 Old Testament quotes or so, more than 2/3 come from the Septuagint. One example is Matthew 1:23. St Matthew quotes the Septuagint Isaiah 7:14, "behold a virgin shall conceive." The Masoretic text is "behold, a young woman shall conceive." Look in your Bible,

Um, no.
The Masoretic text is, "behold, a maiden ("almah") shall conceive".
The Hebrew term, "almah" means more than "young woman", and has connotations of virginity (protectedness, innocence etc.)
 

ziapueblo

Active member
Um, no.
The Masoretic text is, "behold, a maiden ("almah") shall conceive".
The Hebrew term, "almah" means more than "young woman", and has connotations of virginity (protectedness, innocence etc.)
You would agree though that Matthew 1:23 in fact quotes the Septuagint?

I have my Septuagint Old Testament right in front of me, Isaiah 7:14, "Therefore, the Lord Himself will give you a sign: behold, the virgin shall conceive and bear a Son, and you shall call His name Immanuel."
 
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ramcam2

Member
Please Anselm01: take a moment and explain why we should spiritually submit to the authorities merely because God used them for His divine purposes
if you submit to a civil authority, what more to an authority backed up by the almighty power in heaven.

matt16: 19 and I will give to thee the keys of the kingdom of heaven; and whatever thou shalt bind on earth shall be bound in heaven; and whatever thou shalt loose on earth shall be loosed in heaven.
 

1Thess521

Well-known member
if you submit to a civil authority, what more to an authority backed up by the almighty power in heaven.

matt16: 19 and I will give to thee the keys of the kingdom of heaven; and whatever thou shalt bind on earth shall be bound in heaven; and whatever thou shalt loose on earth shall be loosed in heaven.
Cyrus, Pharaoh, Pilate?

The apostles are dead
 
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