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The crucible of history: The loss of community the anthropology of antichristianity

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  • The crucible of history: The loss of community the anthropology of antichristianity

    Interesting article by Hieromonk Gabriel,

    In the most recent article of my series on the anthropology of Antichristianity, I discussed loneliness as the defining characteristic of the modern age, stating that: “We have become existentially unmoored, and so it is no surprise at all that we feel lost, purposeless, and alone.” Faced with such a dilemma, as I see it modern man has only three real choices: Christianity, Antichristianity, or suicide (the latter of which comes in any number of forms). But before examining these choices, I want to give a rather broad and cursory overview of the history of modernity, of the way in which we have come to find ourselves thus “existentially unmoored.”

    The twentieth century witnessed the large-scale disintegration of almost every significant social bond which had previously held mankind together. Two horrific world wars — followed swiftly by new realities ushered in by the forces of economic and cultural globalization — nearly demolished the nationalism which had burgeoned during the nineteenth century (it very much remains to be seen whether the recent resurgence of populist sentiment in many Western nations will last for any meaningful period of time).

    But nineteenth-century nationalism was itself, in many ways, merely a symptom of the loss of the Christian identity which had previously defined the West for over a thousand years. The collapse of Christendom, effected principally by the Reformation (but finding its true cause much earlier in the history of Western Christianity), is the defining event of the past millennium, and the true progenitor of the modern age.

    Once Christendom in the West has been shattered by the Reformation, for a time the chief identity of a society (or of a family within that society) became either Protestant or Catholic — but the catastrophic religious wars of the sixteenth-seventeenth centuries led to the widespread adoption of state secularism (whether de facto or de jure). Religion was not suppressed, but rather privatized — indeed, there is no more fitting adjective with which to describe the character of religion in modernity than “private.” And naturally, that which is a purely private affair cannot possibly form the basis of a social or cultural identity. And though of course religion has endured up until the present day, it has by now become so “private” as to be almost totally inconsequential, even to many of those who still profess to believe. It has been compartmentalized into oblivion. (continued in link.)

    https://www.rememberingsion.com/2018...oss-community/
    In accordance with the Apostolic faith delivered to us by tradition from the Fathers, I have delivered the tradition, without inventing anything extraneous to it. What I have learned, that I inscribed, comfortably with the Holy Scriptures

  • #2
    Originally posted by Iakobos View Post
    Interesting article by Hieromonk Gabriel,

    In the most recent article of my series on the anthropology of Antichristianity, I discussed loneliness as the defining characteristic of the modern age, stating that: “We have become existentially unmoored, and so it is no surprise at all that we feel lost, purposeless, and alone.” Faced with such a dilemma, as I see it modern man has only three real choices: Christianity, Antichristianity, or suicide (the latter of which comes in any number of forms). But before examining these choices, I want to give a rather broad and cursory overview of the history of modernity, of the way in which we have come to find ourselves thus “existentially unmoored.”

    The twentieth century witnessed the large-scale disintegration of almost every significant social bond which had previously held mankind together. Two horrific world wars — followed swiftly by new realities ushered in by the forces of economic and cultural globalization — nearly demolished the nationalism which had burgeoned during the nineteenth century (it very much remains to be seen whether the recent resurgence of populist sentiment in many Western nations will last for any meaningful period of time).

    But nineteenth-century nationalism was itself, in many ways, merely a symptom of the loss of the Christian identity which had previously defined the West for over a thousand years. The collapse of Christendom, effected principally by the Reformation (but finding its true cause much earlier in the history of Western Christianity), is the defining event of the past millennium, and the true progenitor of the modern age.

    Once Christendom in the West has been shattered by the Reformation, for a time the chief identity of a society (or of a family within that society) became either Protestant or Catholic — but the catastrophic religious wars of the sixteenth-seventeenth centuries led to the widespread adoption of state secularism (whether de facto or de jure). Religion was not suppressed, but rather privatized — indeed, there is no more fitting adjective with which to describe the character of religion in modernity than “private.” And naturally, that which is a purely private affair cannot possibly form the basis of a social or cultural identity. And though of course religion has endured up until the present day, it has by now become so “private” as to be almost totally inconsequential, even to many of those who still profess to believe. It has been compartmentalized into oblivion. (continued in link.)

    https://www.rememberingsion.com/2018...oss-community/
    I feel like I could clip quotes from that article and use them to create a book of lamentations.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by HTacianas View Post

      I feel like I could clip quotes from that article and use them to create a book of lamentations.
      Probably could. The Hieromonk is spot on imo.
      In accordance with the Apostolic faith delivered to us by tradition from the Fathers, I have delivered the tradition, without inventing anything extraneous to it. What I have learned, that I inscribed, comfortably with the Holy Scriptures

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Iakobos View Post

        Probably could. The Hieromonk is spot on imo.
        He certainly is. I like his description of the "breakdown" in Western society. No religion. No nationality. No family. Just individuals united by nothing, each going their own way .

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by HTacianas View Post

          He certainly is. I like his description of the "breakdown" in Western society. No religion. No nationality. No family. Just individuals united by nothing, each going their own way .
          His ending is should be a big warning to all.

          In the modern age, we worship ourselves — and without any doubt, we too are jealous gods. It is ultimately our own self-love that has destroyed us, and that cannot help but destroy even that which it holds most dear. We have placed everything in the world upon the altar of our own will and our own desire — and in the holocaust of such a sacrifice, there is absolutely nothing which can endure.

          If you get a chance you might like Fr. Stephans series on the Modern Project

          https://blogs.ancientfaith.com/glory...odern-project/





          In accordance with the Apostolic faith delivered to us by tradition from the Fathers, I have delivered the tradition, without inventing anything extraneous to it. What I have learned, that I inscribed, comfortably with the Holy Scriptures

          Comment

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