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Atheists die younger

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  • Atheists die younger

    One of the evidences of greater adaptability is longevity. Simply put, research reveals that religious people live longer. Here is part of the abstract of another recent study:

    Self-reported religious service attendance has been linked with longevity. However, previous work has largely relied on self-report data and volunteer samples. Here, mention of a religious affiliation in obituaries was analyzed as an alternative measure of religiosity. In two samples (N= 505 from Des Moines, IA, and N = 1,096 from 42 U.S. cities), the religiously affiliated lived 9.45 and 5.64 years longer, respectively, than the nonreligiously affiliated. Additionally, social integration and volunteerism partially mediated the religion–longevity relation.

    http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full...48550618779820
    Open Heart, who loves the Lord.

    For nothing is hidden that will not be made manifest, nor is anything secret that will not be known and come to light.

  • #2
    Originally posted by Open Heart View Post
    One of the evidences of greater adaptability is longevity. Simply put, research reveals that religious people live longer. Here is part of the abstract of another recent study:

    Self-reported religious service attendance has been linked with longevity. However, previous work has largely relied on self-report data and volunteer samples. Here, mention of a religious affiliation in obituaries was analyzed as an alternative measure of religiosity. In two samples (N= 505 from Des Moines, IA, and N = 1,096 from 42 U.S. cities), the religiously affiliated lived 9.45 and 5.64 years longer, respectively, than the nonreligiously affiliated. Additionally, social integration and volunteerism partially mediated the religion–longevity relation.

    http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full...48550618779820
    So atheism ISNT a religion now and atheists ARENT religious all of a sudden? Ooooo. Kkkkkkkk.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Open Heart View Post
      One of the evidences of greater adaptability is longevity. Simply put, research reveals that religious people live longer. Here is part of the abstract of another recent study:

      Self-reported religious service attendance has been linked with longevity. However, previous work has largely relied on self-report data and volunteer samples. Here, mention of a religious affiliation in obituaries was analyzed as an alternative measure of religiosity. In two samples (N= 505 from Des Moines, IA, and N = 1,096 from 42 U.S. cities), the religiously affiliated lived 9.45 and 5.64 years longer, respectively, than the nonreligiously affiliated. Additionally, social integration and volunteerism partially mediated the religion–longevity relation.

      http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full...48550618779820
      So if I join a church, I might live longer? I'll keep that in mind.

      But it would make a difference if they could show what the causal relation is.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Open Heart View Post
        One of the evidences of greater adaptability is longevity. Simply put, research reveals that religious people live longer. Here is part of the abstract of another recent study:

        Self-reported religious service attendance has been linked with longevity. However, previous work has largely relied on self-report data and volunteer samples. Here, mention of a religious affiliation in obituaries was analyzed as an alternative measure of religiosity. In two samples (N= 505 from Des Moines, IA, and N = 1,096 from 42 U.S. cities), the religiously affiliated lived 9.45 and 5.64 years longer, respectively, than the nonreligiously affiliated. Additionally, social integration and volunteerism partially mediated the religion–longevity relation.

        http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full...48550618779820
        The paper doesn't say what you claim. Not having a religious affiliation in one's obituary does not automatically mean one was an atheist.
        "We have a pathological liar in the White House, unfit intellectually, emotionally, and psychologically to hold this office, and the whole world knows it, especially those around him every day." - Gregg Popovich

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Tyrrho View Post

          So if I join a church, I might live longer? I'll keep that in mind.

          But it would make a difference if they could show what the causal relation is.
          You don't have to join a church, just make arrangements to have a church mentioned in your obit and you're good for 5 extra years.
          "We have a pathological liar in the White House, unfit intellectually, emotionally, and psychologically to hold this office, and the whole world knows it, especially those around him every day." - Gregg Popovich

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Open Heart View Post
            One of the evidences of greater adaptability is longevity. Simply put, research reveals that religious people live longer. Here is part of the abstract of another recent study:

            Self-reported religious service attendance has been linked with longevity. However, previous work has largely relied on self-report data and volunteer samples. Here, mention of a religious affiliation in obituaries was analyzed as an alternative measure of religiosity. In two samples (N= 505 from Des Moines, IA, and N = 1,096 from 42 U.S. cities), the religiously affiliated lived 9.45 and 5.64 years longer, respectively, than the nonreligiously affiliated. Additionally, social integration and volunteerism partially mediated the religion–longevity relation.

            http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full...48550618779820
            So why do non-Christian countries have longer longevities than the Christian countries, and is that because the aim of true-blue Christians is to kick the bucket as early as possible? https://www.infoplease.com/world/hea...cy-countries-0
            Last edited by juglans1; 07-12-18, 10:47 PM.
            ... always look on the bright side of life - Idle Cleese

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Open Heart View Post
              One of the evidences of greater adaptability is longevity. Simply put, research reveals that religious people live longer. Here is part of the abstract of another recent study:
              [I]Self-reported religious service attendance has been linked with longevity. However, previous work has largely relied on self-report data and volunteer samples. Here, mention of a religious affiliation in obituaries was analyzed as an alternative measure of religiosity. In two samples (N= 505 from Des Moines, IA, and N = 1,096 from 42 U.S. cities), the religiously affiliated lived 9.45 and 5.64 years longer, respectively, than the nonreligiously affiliated. Additionally, social integration and volunteerism partially mediated the religion–longevity relation.
              [url]http://journals.sagepub.com/doi ...
              n>Hmmmm... time to consider...
              1) Why would nihilists and other depressed loons want to live longer or value long life for anyone?
              2) Nouveau has linked us to statistics of atheists slaughtering religious and atheistic people... so, get rid of those atheistic mass murders and lots of people live longer. Lesson to those dealing with Noko... bent on mass annihilation and threatening to slaughter millions.
              3) Some religions actually claim that their people have eternal life... factor that into your numbers.
              4) I have yet to hear an atheist claim to have life after death... so their numbers look pathetic... as lots of their "Duh, I dunno." stuff does.

              .
              Mouser Larry Roy: "yippee ki yay"
              “... see the loonies in their cages… are they not witty… how much amusement they afford… ours is a human world, theirs is a bestial world… " Bedlam

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Open Heart View Post
                One of the evidences of greater adaptability is longevity. Simply put, research reveals that religious people live longer. Here is part of the abstract of another recent study:

                Self-reported religious service attendance has been linked with longevity. However, previous work has largely relied on self-report data and volunteer samples. Here, mention of a religious affiliation in obituaries was analyzed as an alternative measure of religiosity. In two samples (N= 505 from Des Moines, IA, and N = 1,096 from 42 U.S. cities), the religiously affiliated lived 9.45 and 5.64 years longer, respectively, than the nonreligiously affiliated. Additionally, social integration and volunteerism partially mediated the religion–longevity relation.

                http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full...48550618779820
                Atheists are a minority that is discriminated against in our society. Of course their lifespans are shorter.
                "There is no singular thing in nature that is more useful to man than a man who lives according to the guidance of reason."
                ~ Spinoza, Ethics, 4p35c1

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Open Heart View Post
                  One of the evidences of greater adaptability is longevity. Simply put, research reveals that religious people live longer. Here is part of the abstract of another recent study:

                  Self-reported religious service attendance has been linked with longevity. However, previous work has largely relied on self-report data and volunteer samples. Here, mention of a religious affiliation in obituaries was analyzed as an alternative measure of religiosity. In two samples (N= 505 from Des Moines, IA, and N = 1,096 from 42 U.S. cities), the religiously affiliated lived 9.45 and 5.64 years longer, respectively, than the nonreligiously affiliated. Additionally, social integration and volunteerism partially mediated the religion–longevity relation.

                  http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full...48550618779820
                  I didn't read the linked article, because I'll accept it as at least mostly true for the sake of discussion.

                  There's nothing I as an atheist can do about it. Even if theists were happier and had more money and lived longer, that's not a justifiable reason to believe gods exist. Belief of the kind we're discussing can't be turned on or off by an act of will - so I'm fated (statistically) to die younger than you will.

                  More importantly, I've always said religion has benefits, and peace of mind can be one of the bigger ones. This study actually reinforces my atheistic worldview.

                  ps. Hi OpenHeart, long time no chat. Whatever else may have happened in this forum, I see questions/posts from you as sincere; had one of the regular trolls posted this article, I would have assumed it was meant to chastise atheists for not believing in the right things. From you, I don't assume that - but not having read much past the first post in the thread, I'm curious as to what you find significant about this story...
                  Imagination is a very potent thing, and in the uneducated often usurps the place of genuine experience.

                  ~ H.P. Lovecraft

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by America View Post
                    ps. Hi OpenHeart, long time no chat. Whatever else may have happened in this forum, I see questions/posts from you as sincere; had one of the regular trolls posted this article, I would have assumed it was meant to chastise atheists for not believing in the right things. From you, I don't assume that - but not having read much past the first post in the thread, I'm curious as to what you find significant about this story...
                    Well, first, I find these results surprising. I would have thought there would be no difference.

                    My second thought was, what factor is it about religious affiliation that makes the religious live longer? The strong communal relations? Weekly singing aloud? Frequent pot lucks? Researchers really need to start nailing down the specifics.

                    My third thought was that a pattern is forming, which I alluded to in my post. I'm not going to document it because I don't want the thread to go off onto a tangent, but it seems religious affiliation is correlated with a set of related states: happiness, healthiness, and longevity. IOW it seems that religious affiliation makes for a better quality of life in general. I believe the statistics are also true that religious folks have more kids. I'd have to double check on that. But it makes me wonder if religion isn't just downright more ADAPTABLE.

                    As always, I'm just thinking. I'm sifting through facts and forming hypotheses that need further testing.

                    Technically, even if religion were more adaptable, it would not prove the atheist position wrong.

                    But if I were an atheist, knowing my quality of life was less than, I'd at least give religion a second looksy to see what it has to offer and why, as perhaps I might have missed something significant. I might look for ways to incorporate as much religion in my life as I could without violating my beliefs. Looking for a "higher power" of some sort, exploring non-theistic religions, or attending an atheist church.

                    I guess what I'm saying is that there are two different ways an atheist can approach religion. Let me give the analogy of how a non-observant Jew might approach Jewish law. He might say to himself, "There's no way I'm going to go all day on Saturday without switching on and off light switches in my house. Forget the Torah, I'm having none of it!" Or he might say to himself, "I'm not going to think about all of the 613 mitzvot. All I'm going to think about is thou shalt not steal. I'm going to resolve to stop swiping little things from the office." In the first case he sees it as an all or nothing deal and dumps it all. In the second case he sees it as a continuum that he can find a spot for himself on. My suggestion is, considering that science is revealing real advantages to being religious, try to find a comfortable spot on the continuum, instead of throwing out the whole thing.
                    Last edited by Open Heart; 07-13-18, 03:47 AM.
                    Open Heart, who loves the Lord.

                    For nothing is hidden that will not be made manifest, nor is anything secret that will not be known and come to light.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Occam View Post
                      Atheists are a minority that is discriminated against in our society. Of course their lifespans are shorter.
                      Are you asserting that discrimination against atheists or atheism has the result of shortening lifespans?

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Open Heart View Post
                        One of the evidences of greater adaptability is longevity. Simply put, research reveals that religious people live longer. Here is part of the abstract of another recent study:
                        I didn't know longevity is evidence of one's prowess in adapting. Where did you learn this?

                        Self-reported religious service attendance has been linked with longevity. However, previous work has largely relied on self-report data and volunteer samples. Here, mention of a religious affiliation in obituaries was analyzed as an alternative measure of religiosity. In two samples (N= 505 from Des Moines, IA, and N = 1,096 from 42 U.S. cities), the religiously affiliated lived 9.45 and 5.64 years longer, respectively, than the nonreligiously affiliated. Additionally, social integration and volunteerism partially mediated the religion–longevity relation.

                        http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full...48550618779820
                        That's nice. How does this relate to adaptability? You lead this whole thread off with "one of the evidences of greater adaptability is longevity" so.... balls in your court.
                        If God did not exist, it would be necessary to invent him. - Voltaire

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by simplicio View Post
                          Are you asserting that discrimination against atheists or atheism has the result of shortening lifespans?
                          It's almost certainly one contributing factor.
                          "There is no singular thing in nature that is more useful to man than a man who lives according to the guidance of reason."
                          ~ Spinoza, Ethics, 4p35c1

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Occam View Post
                            It's almost certainly one contributing factor.
                            I don't see how atheists are discriminated against in any way that would affect lifespan.

                            It seems more likely to me that the study is showing that religion is more important to older people, or something mundane like that.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Tyrrho View Post
                              I don't see how atheists are discriminated against in any way that would affect lifespan.

                              It seems more likely to me that the study is showing that religion is more important to older people, or something mundane like that.
                              People routinely lose friends and face opposition from relatives over atheism. The stress from that kind of repeated negative interaction would likely contribute to a shorter lifespan.
                              "There is no singular thing in nature that is more useful to man than a man who lives according to the guidance of reason."
                              ~ Spinoza, Ethics, 4p35c1

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