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The name God Almighty, All Sufficient - Genesis 17:1

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  • The name God Almighty, All Sufficient - Genesis 17:1

    The morphology of the word used for God in this verse and others for God Almighty is singular in form.

    This verse says that this singular God, who is YHWH as well, is singular, and sufficient in Himself, without others.

    He also happens to be the Most High God, Genesis 14:20,22.

    How can one argue that God requires other persons in the godhead to be perfect, when He is All Sufficient already?
    Everyone thinks of changing the world, but no one thinks of changing himself. Leo Tolstoy

  • #2
    Originally posted by Gumby View Post
    The morphology of the word used for God in this verse and others for God Almighty is singular in form.

    This verse says that this singular God, who is YHWH as well, is singular, and sufficient in Himself, without others.

    He also happens to be the Most High God, Genesis 14:20,22.

    How can one argue that God requires other persons in the godhead to be perfect, when He is All Sufficient already?
    There is only one perfect thing on this planet. You cant change it, you cant govern it by law, it is the same yesterday as today and will be the same tomorrow and that is a Spirit and that Spirit is Love, for God simply is Love and man is the recipient of, the temple of, the vessel for. Jesus received this Spirit in Matt 3:16 just as we all do who is born of the God of. For in that He is sufficient, the head of my body, the Godhead bodily.

    He is sufficient but in order for us to be sufficient in Him one has to receive it in themselves just as Jesus and all these others who received Him did to be their own mind, head. And you are correct there is only one Spirit of Love, there is none other.
    The human side is to claim the promises of God. The divine side is to receive them.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by GaryMac View Post
      There is only one perfect thing on this planet. You cant change it, you cant govern it by law, it is the same yesterday as today and will be the same tomorrow and that is a Spirit and that Spirit is Love, for God simply is Love and man is the recipient of, the temple of, the vessel for. Jesus received this Spirit in Matt 3:16 just as we all do who is born of the God of. For in that He is sufficient, the head of my body, the Godhead bodily.

      He is sufficient but in order for us to be sufficient in Him one has to receive it in themselves just as Jesus and all these others who received Him did to be their own mind, head. And you are correct there is only one Spirit of Love, there is none other.
      We shouldn't limit God to just love.
      Everyone thinks of changing the world, but no one thinks of changing himself. Leo Tolstoy

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Gumby View Post
        The morphology of the word used for God in this verse and others for God Almighty is singular in form.

        This verse says that this singular God, who is YHWH as well, is singular, and sufficient in Himself, without others.

        He also happens to be the Most High God, Genesis 14:20,22.

        How can one argue that God requires other persons in the godhead to be perfect, when He is All Sufficient already?
        Gen 1:26
        26 Then God said, "Let us make man in our image, in our likeness, and let them rule over the fish of the sea and the birds of the air, over the livestock, over all the earth, and over all the creatures that move along the ground."

        "Let us ..." and "in our image". Curious language for a singular being.

        And...

        Gen 1:2
        Now the earth was formless and empty, darkness was over the surface of the deep, and the Spirit of God was hovering over the waters.

        We agree that God is a spirit being, but how is it that there is another being referred to as "the Spirit of God"?
        Allen (Unless noted otherwise, Bible quotations are from the 1984 edition of the NIV)

        Faith--Sees the invisible, believes the incredible, and receives the impossible.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Gumby View Post
          The morphology of the word used for God in this verse and others for God Almighty is singular in form.

          This verse says that this singular God, who is YHWH as well, is singular, and sufficient in Himself, without others.

          He also happens to be the Most High God, Genesis 14:20,22.

          How can one argue that God requires other persons in the godhead to be perfect, when He is All Sufficient already?
          So what does God himself say on this matter???Isaiah 44:24
          Thus saith the Lord, thy redeemer, and he that formed thee from the womb, I am the Lord that maketh all things; that stretcheth forth the heavens alone; that spreadeth abroad the earth by myself;

          Mmmm seems like God doesn't need any help... but unbelievers will say that he does...

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by newbirth View Post

            So what does God himself say on this matter???Isaiah 44:24
            Thus saith the Lord, thy redeemer, and he that formed thee from the womb, I am the Lord that maketh all things; that stretcheth forth the heavens alone; that spreadeth abroad the earth by myself;

            Mmmm seems like God doesn't need any help... but unbelievers will say that he does...
            I agree with you.
            Everyone thinks of changing the world, but no one thinks of changing himself. Leo Tolstoy

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by AlFin View Post
              Gen 1:26
              26 Then God said, "Let us make man in our image, in our likeness, and let them rule over the fish of the sea and the birds of the air, over the livestock, over all the earth, and over all the creatures that move along the ground."

              "Let us ..." and "in our image". Curious language for a singular being.
              The only being in the context is God, which in the Hebrew is a plural morphological form for eloah. So, you believe multiple gods are in conversation in Gen 1:26, though the verb form for "said", is singular? Noun and verb forms must agree, so the subject speaking must be a singular person.

              Originally posted by AlFin View Post
              ​​And...

              Gen 1:2
              Now the earth was formless and empty, darkness was over the surface of the deep, and the Spirit of God was hovering over the waters.

              We agree that God is a spirit being, but how is it that there is another being referred to as "the Spirit of God"?
              Nothing talks about another being. Ruach in Hebrew is merely wind, breath, will, desire. Not a person.

              If you could focus on the OP, that would be appreciated.
              Everyone thinks of changing the world, but no one thinks of changing himself. Leo Tolstoy

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Gumby View Post
                I agree with you.
                I'd rather you say that we agreed with the scripture...

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by newbirth View Post
                  I'd rather you say that we agreed with the scripture...
                  I think that's implied, but okay.
                  Everyone thinks of changing the world, but no one thinks of changing himself. Leo Tolstoy

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Gumby View Post
                    The only being in the context is God, which in the Hebrew is a plural morphological form for eloah. So, you believe multiple gods are in conversation in Gen 1:26, though the verb form for "said", is singular? Noun and verb forms must agree, so the subject speaking must be a singular person.

                    Nothing talks about another being. Ruach in Hebrew is merely wind, breath, will, desire. Not a person.
                    And how do you think ancient Hebrew would have referred to a spirit (which is not a physical being)?

                    I'm certain that God gave the ancient Hebrews their language, so He would have been aware of the plural form for "God," and there would have been a reason He did that.

                    Also, in post #1 you stated this:

                    He also happens to be the Most High God, Genesis 14:20,22.
                    If "God" consists of only one entity, why the "Most High" language, since stating this implies there are slightly lower beings who are also God?
                    Allen (Unless noted otherwise, Bible quotations are from the 1984 edition of the NIV)

                    Faith--Sees the invisible, believes the incredible, and receives the impossible.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by AlFin View Post
                      And how do you think ancient Hebrew would have referred to a spirit (which is not a physical being)?
                      As spirit. Spirit is used as the will or desire of God in Tanakh. God directs things to happen. To say a nonphysical spirit is hovering over water would contradict the thought. Jews did not believe in an extra person being God.

                      Angels are also spirit, wind, ruach, as in Psalm 104:4. Angels are created, and can hover, like the wind.

                      Originally posted by AlFin View Post
                      I'm certain that God gave the ancient Hebrews their language, so He would have been aware of the plural form for "God," and there would have been a reason He did that.
                      Yes, and if it meant 3 or more persons as in Genesis 1:26, then you're belief system is polytheism. The verb form shows elohim is singular. Hebrew shows that intensive nouns, words, are used to denote several thoughts at a single time like multiple attributes, Exodus 34:6, for God, or age and wisdom in Jacob, Genesis 37:3, or a virgin and her signs, Deut 22:15.

                      Since God created man in His image, Exodus 34:6, it's perfectly fine to denote this plural of intensity.

                      Originally posted by AlFin View Post
                      Also, in post #1 you stated this:

                      If "God" consists of only one entity, why the "Most High" language, since stating this implies there are slightly lower beings who are also God?
                      Think about your comment. If there is a Most High God, above all others, then your god is not really the god to pray to. The Father Creator is the Most High God and The Almighty and Self-sufficient.

                      The term elohim is used for angels, Psalm 8:5, prophets, Exodus 7:1, judges Exodus 22:8-9, the house of David, Zechariah 12:8.

                      So, there are levels of authority, under the Most High.

                      So, why isn't God's name of The Almighty, Self-Sufficient, in the plural?
                      Everyone thinks of changing the world, but no one thinks of changing himself. Leo Tolstoy

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Gumby View Post
                        We shouldn't limit God to just love.
                        Is your god something else?
                        The human side is to claim the promises of God. The divine side is to receive them.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by GaryMac View Post
                          Is your god something else?
                          He's more than just love.
                          Everyone thinks of changing the world, but no one thinks of changing himself. Leo Tolstoy

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Gumby View Post
                            He's more than just love.
                            Can you expound for what that might be?
                            The human side is to claim the promises of God. The divine side is to receive them.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by GaryMac View Post
                              Can you expound for what that might be?
                              Yes, the Tanakh doesn't limit God to just love.
                              Everyone thinks of changing the world, but no one thinks of changing himself. Leo Tolstoy

                              Comment

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