Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Isaiah 54: A prophecy about the coming of Islam in Arabia.

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Isaiah 54: A prophecy about the coming of Islam in Arabia.

    Islam as we all know know, originated in Arabia. The Arab peoples are generally considered to be the progeny of Ishmael, who was the son of Abraham through his second wife, Hagar. Given that Hagar and Ishmael were part of Abraham's family, it is important that we pay attention to their stories, as that would give us the key to interpret many Biblical prophecies -- of which one is Isaiah 54.

    The story of Hagar in the Bible is that she was the maidservant of Sarah,the wife of Abraham. And that Sarah gave Hagar to Abraham to be his wife -- the reason being she thought she was too old for a child and wanted Abraham to have a child through Hagar. The child born of the union of Abraham and Hagar was Ishmael. Genesis tells us that at some point when Ishmael was older, he and his mother were driven out of Abraham's household by Sarah. Hagar and her child were abandoned in the wilderness and had to fend for themselves. When Ishmael grew up, he went on to become the father of 12 princes. After that, we don't really hear much about Ishmael, except that he reunited briefly with Isaac for Abraham's funeral and became the father of 12 princes. And with this, Ishmael's story appears to end in the Bible.

    But. there was something special about Hagar's child. At some point when she was pregnant with Ishmael, Hagar had run away from Abraham's household to escape the hardships she had to face at the hands of Sarah. Hagar then ends up in the desert where she encounters an angel of God who tells her to go back home. She is also given a very special blessing: that is, her descendants would increase so much that they will be too numerous to count.

    "And the angel of the LORD said unto her, I will multiply thy seed exceedingly, that it shall not be numbered for multitude" (Genesis 16:10)

    In a later chapter, God Himself tells Abraham that He would make Ishmael a nation.

    Yet I will also make a nation of the son of the bondwoman, because he is your seed. (Genesis 21:13)

    These blessings are extremely significant. Because even though Abraham had 8 children, 1 from Hagar (Ishmael), 1 from Sarah (Isaac) and 6 from a woman named Keturah, it was only Isaac and Ishmael that were blessed by God to become great nations. Given this, we can establish that the blessings given to Hagar and Ishmael are not something that can be discounted or glossed over.

    So what do these blessings mean? Does it just mean Ishmael's descendants would increase in number? Then what about other peoples such as the Chinese and the Indians? They are larger in number than the Arabs, even though they did not receive any blessing that we know of in the Bible. So we can assume that the blessing to become a nation has a spiritual meaning to it. Perhaps, it means a nation that is given prophetic guidance and the law of God.

    What was the prophetic destiny of the nation that descended from Hagar? The answer to that lies in Isaiah 54. Here are a few key verses.

    Verse 1a: “Sing, barren woman, you who never bore a child; burst into song, shout for joy, you who were never in labor...."

    The bible often portrays nations and kingdoms as women. We see this in Ezekiel 16 and 23, Revelation 18 and Jeremiah 3. We can safely assume that Isaiah 54:1 is also taking about a nation, as opposed to a literal woman. This nation is "barren" in that it had never birthed a prophet. It could also mean that they were devoid of any spiritual blessings.

    Verse 1b: "...because more are the children of the desolate woman than of her who has a husband,”says the Lord."

    This part is talking about real literal women.

    The first interpretation could be that the desolate woman is Hagar, and the woman with the husband is Sarah. After all, Hagar was sent away from Abraham's household, thirsty and in despair, while Sarah lived with Abraham as long as she lived. It is also true that the descendants of Hagar through Ishmael were more than that of Sarah through Isaac.

    An alternate interpretation could be that Hagar is the one with a husband, while the desolate woman could represent the pagan nations, who were, at that time, greater in number than the children of Abraham.

    Verse 2: "Enlarge the place of your tent, stretch your tent curtains wide, do not hold back; lengthen your cords, strengthen your stakes

    Notice the use of the imagery in tents. In the Bible, tents have been associated with the Arabs. See Psalm 120:5, Jeremiah 49:28-29 and Song of Solomon 1:5. So the use of the word "tent" and words pertaining to it are not random.

    Now verse 3 is where things get really interesting.

    Verse 3: For you will spread out to the right and to the left; your descendants will dispossess nations and settle in their desolate cities"

    The nation referred to as the barren woman earlier -- that is, the Arabs -- was prophesied to spread out to the right and the left, or as we would say, east and west. The question is: did the Arabs ever spread out to the east and west? Did they ever establish an empire and settle physically, linguistically and spiritually in the places that they conquered?
    What does history tell us?

    The part about spreading to the east and west could only be a reference to the rapid expansion of Islam to the east and the west. Islam conquered all of Arabia during Mohammad's lifetime. Within only a 100 years, it had conquered all of the middle east, Persia to the east and North Africa to the west. Those regions remain Islamic to this day.

    This prophecy could not have been fulfilled by the Jewish kingdom in the holy land, which for most of its existence, was confined to a very small region in the middle east. It also could not have been fulfilled by Christianity, considering Jesus never established a kingdom.

    Verses 4 & 6: "Do not fear disgrace; you will not be humiliated. You will forget the shame of your youth and remember no more the reproach of your widowhood. The Lord will call you back as if you were a wife deserted and distressed in spirit— a wife who married young, only to be rejected,” says your God.

    These are references to Hagar or the Arab nation. If it is about Hagar, then it's true that she was a wife who was deserted, abandoned and left to fend for herself.. She was distressed in the middle of a wasteland. She married young, made pregnant and cast out of Abraham's household.

    If it's about the Arab nation, then it's also true that Ishmael and his progeny were seperated from their Abraham and were to dwell in the desert as nomads, and without guidance about God.

    Verses 14 & 15: In righteousness you will be established: Tyranny will be far from you; you will have nothing to fear. Terror will be far removed; it will not come near you. If anyone does attack you, it will not be my doing; whoever attacks you will surrender to you.

    This is being said to the Arab nation. These verses are a prophecy pertaining to the specific moment in Arabia when the Muslims conquered Mecca peacefully without bloodshed (with the exception of 10 criminals who were executed).

    The words "Tyranny will be far from you", "you will have nothing to fear" and "terror will be far removed" perfectly summarize what the Meccan Arabs could expect when Muslim forces entered Mecca as victors.

    The reason for this is that the Arab pagans had good reason to fear for their lives. This is so because when they had the upper hand, they abused Mohammad, denied his prophethood and wanted him dead. After their defeat, they imagined the victorious Muslims would behave as tyrants; they feared that they would be killed and that their women and children would be taken prisoners. But to their surprise, Mohammad forgave them and assured them them that they had nothing to fear. This fulfilled the prophecy of Isaiah 54:3.

    In conclusion, the prophecy of Isaiah 54 points to the establishment of Islam.

  • #2
    While you're explaining Biblical prophecy for us how about explaining the passages where God says what He will do to those who mistreat the Jews?? And while your at it, tell us what Muhammad did to the Jews in Arabia!!!
    Joh 8:36 So if the Son sets you free, you will be free indeed. [NIV]

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Trucker View Post
      While you're explaining Biblical prophecy for us how about explaining the passages where God says what He will do to those who mistreat the Jews??
      Which verse are you referring to exactly?

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by sk0rpi0n View Post
        Originally posted by Trucker
        While you're explaining Biblical prophecy for us how about explaining the passages where God says what He will do to those who mistreat the Jews??
        Which verse are you referring to exactly?
        I thought I made it clear what verses [PLURAL] I referred to. ..... how about explaining the passages [NOTE THE PLURAL AGAIN!] where God says what He will do to those who mistreat the Jews??

        Then I also asked you to ....
        while your at it, tell us what Muhammad did to the Jews in Arabia!!

        Please do. If you can't find them I'll be glad to post some of 'em for you.
        Joh 8:36 So if the Son sets you free, you will be free indeed. [NIV]

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Trucker View Post

          I thought I made it clear what verses [PLURAL] I referred to. ..... how about explaining the passages [NOTE THE PLURAL AGAIN!] where God says what He will do to those who mistreat the Jews??

          Then I also asked you to ....
          while your at it, tell us what Muhammad did to the Jews in Arabia!!

          Please do. If you can't find them I'll be glad to post some of 'em for you.
          I asked you for the verses from the bible that you are referring to when you asked "how about explaining the passages where God says what He will do to those who mistreat the Jews??"

          what passages are you thinking of exactly?

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by sk0rpi0n View Post
            I asked you for the verses from the bible that you are referring to when you asked "how about explaining the passages where God says what He will do to those who mistreat the Jews??"

            what passages are you thinking of exactly?
            Seems strange that one who would presume to explain Biblical prophecy to Christians would then have to ask what passages I was referring to!

            But, be that as it may, how about starting out with Genesis 12:1-3 and then Gen 15:18-21?
            Joh 8:36 So if the Son sets you free, you will be free indeed. [NIV]

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by sk0rpi0n View Post
              Islam as we all know know, originated in Arabia. The Arab peoples are generally considered to be the progeny of Ishmael, who was the son of Abraham through his second wife, Hagar. Given that Hagar and Ishmael were part of Abraham's family, it is important that we pay attention to their stories, as that would give us the key to interpret many Biblical prophecies -- of which one is Isaiah 54.

              The story of Hagar in the Bible is that she was the maidservant of Sarah,the wife of Abraham. And that Sarah gave Hagar to Abraham to be his wife -- the reason being she thought she was too old for a child and wanted Abraham to have a child through Hagar. The child born of the union of Abraham and Hagar was Ishmael. Genesis tells us that at some point when Ishmael was older, he and his mother were driven out of Abraham's household by Sarah. Hagar and her child were abandoned in the wilderness and had to fend for themselves. When Ishmael grew up, he went on to become the father of 12 princes. After that, we don't really hear much about Ishmael, except that he reunited briefly with Isaac for Abraham's funeral and became the father of 12 princes. And with this, Ishmael's story appears to end in the Bible.

              But. there was something special about Hagar's child. At some point when she was pregnant with Ishmael, Hagar had run away from Abraham's household to escape the hardships she had to face at the hands of Sarah. Hagar then ends up in the desert where she encounters an angel of God who tells her to go back home. She is also given a very special blessing: that is, her descendants would increase so much that they will be too numerous to count.

              "And the angel of the LORD said unto her, I will multiply thy seed exceedingly, that it shall not be numbered for multitude" (Genesis 16:10)

              In a later chapter, God Himself tells Abraham that He would make Ishmael a nation.

              Yet I will also make a nation of the son of the bondwoman, because he is your seed. (Genesis 21:13)

              These blessings are extremely significant. Because even though Abraham had 8 children, 1 from Hagar (Ishmael), 1 from Sarah (Isaac) and 6 from a woman named Keturah, it was only Isaac and Ishmael that were blessed by God to become great nations. Given this, we can establish that the blessings given to Hagar and Ishmael are not something that can be discounted or glossed over.

              So what do these blessings mean? Does it just mean Ishmael's descendants would increase in number? Then what about other peoples such as the Chinese and the Indians? They are larger in number than the Arabs, even though they did not receive any blessing that we know of in the Bible. So we can assume that the blessing to become a nation has a spiritual meaning to it. Perhaps, it means a nation that is given prophetic guidance and the law of God.

              What was the prophetic destiny of the nation that descended from Hagar? The answer to that lies in Isaiah 54. Here are a few key verses.

              Verse 1a: “Sing, barren woman, you who never bore a child; burst into song, shout for joy, you who were never in labor...."

              The bible often portrays nations and kingdoms as women. We see this in Ezekiel 16 and 23, Revelation 18 and Jeremiah 3. We can safely assume that Isaiah 54:1 is also taking about a nation, as opposed to a literal woman. This nation is "barren" in that it had never birthed a prophet. It could also mean that they were devoid of any spiritual blessings.

              Verse 1b: "...because more are the children of the desolate woman than of her who has a husband,”says the Lord."

              This part is talking about real literal women.

              The first interpretation could be that the desolate woman is Hagar, and the woman with the husband is Sarah. After all, Hagar was sent away from Abraham's household, thirsty and in despair, while Sarah lived with Abraham as long as she lived. It is also true that the descendants of Hagar through Ishmael were more than that of Sarah through Isaac.

              An alternate interpretation could be that Hagar is the one with a husband, while the desolate woman could represent the pagan nations, who were, at that time, greater in number than the children of Abraham.

              Verse 2: "Enlarge the place of your tent, stretch your tent curtains wide, do not hold back; lengthen your cords, strengthen your stakes

              Notice the use of the imagery in tents. In the Bible, tents have been associated with the Arabs. See Psalm 120:5, Jeremiah 49:28-29 and Song of Solomon 1:5. So the use of the word "tent" and words pertaining to it are not random.

              Now verse 3 is where things get really interesting.

              Verse 3: For you will spread out to the right and to the left; your descendants will dispossess nations and settle in their desolate cities"

              The nation referred to as the barren woman earlier -- that is, the Arabs -- was prophesied to spread out to the right and the left, or as we would say, east and west. The question is: did the Arabs ever spread out to the east and west? Did they ever establish an empire and settle physically, linguistically and spiritually in the places that they conquered?
              What does history tell us?

              The part about spreading to the east and west could only be a reference to the rapid expansion of Islam to the east and the west. Islam conquered all of Arabia during Mohammad's lifetime. Within only a 100 years, it had conquered all of the middle east, Persia to the east and North Africa to the west. Those regions remain Islamic to this day.

              This prophecy could not have been fulfilled by the Jewish kingdom in the holy land, which for most of its existence, was confined to a very small region in the middle east. It also could not have been fulfilled by Christianity, considering Jesus never established a kingdom.

              Verses 4 & 6: "Do not fear disgrace; you will not be humiliated. You will forget the shame of your youth and remember no more the reproach of your widowhood. The Lord will call you back as if you were a wife deserted and distressed in spirit— a wife who married young, only to be rejected,” says your God.

              These are references to Hagar or the Arab nation. If it is about Hagar, then it's true that she was a wife who was deserted, abandoned and left to fend for herself.. She was distressed in the middle of a wasteland. She married young, made pregnant and cast out of Abraham's household.

              If it's about the Arab nation, then it's also true that Ishmael and his progeny were seperated from their Abraham and were to dwell in the desert as nomads, and without guidance about God.

              Verses 14 & 15: In righteousness you will be established: Tyranny will be far from you; you will have nothing to fear. Terror will be far removed; it will not come near you. If anyone does attack you, it will not be my doing; whoever attacks you will surrender to you.

              This is being said to the Arab nation. These verses are a prophecy pertaining to the specific moment in Arabia when the Muslims conquered Mecca peacefully without bloodshed (with the exception of 10 criminals who were executed).

              The words "Tyranny will be far from you", "you will have nothing to fear" and "terror will be far removed" perfectly summarize what the Meccan Arabs could expect when Muslim forces entered Mecca as victors.

              The reason for this is that the Arab pagans had good reason to fear for their lives. This is so because when they had the upper hand, they abused Mohammad, denied his prophethood and wanted him dead. After their defeat, they imagined the victorious Muslims would behave as tyrants; they feared that they would be killed and that their women and children would be taken prisoners. But to their surprise, Mohammad forgave them and assured them them that they had nothing to fear. This fulfilled the prophecy of Isaiah 54:3.

              In conclusion, the prophecy of Isaiah 54 points to the establishment of Islam.
              You have already started this topic.

              https://forums.carm.org/vb5/forum/wo...gence-of-islam

              They will put you out of the synagogue; in fact, the time is coming when anyone who kills you will think they are offering a service to God. John 16:2

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Trucker View Post
                Seems strange that one who would presume to explain Biblical prophecy to Christians would then have to ask what passages I was referring to!

                But, be that as it may, how about starting out with Genesis 12:1-3 and then Gen 15:18-21?
                Hmmm ....

                I guess Scorpion lost interest in explaining either the Bible or the Qur'an for us.
                Joh 8:36 So if the Son sets you free, you will be free indeed. [NIV]

                Comment

                Working...
                X